Mrs. Dalloway

Mrs. Dalloway

Hardback

By (author) Virginia Woolf, Introduction by Nadia Fusini

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  • Publisher: EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
  • Format: Hardback | 224 pages
  • Dimensions: 132mm x 208mm x 22mm | 381g
  • Publication date: 11 March 1993
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 1857151577
  • ISBN 13: 9781857151572
  • Sales rank: 205,554

Product description

Tracing a day in the life of society hostess Clarissa Dalloway, Virginia Woolf triumphantly discovers her distinctive style as a novelist. First published in 1925, MRS DALLOWAY is her first complete rendering of what Woolf described as the 'luminous envelope' of consciousness: a dazzling display of the mind's inside as it plays over the brilliant surface and darker depths of reality.

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Author information

Virginia Woolf was born in London in 1882, the daughter of Sir Leslie Stephen, first editor of The Dictionary of National Biography. After his death in 1904 Virginia and her sister, the painter Vanessa Bell, moved to Bloomsbury and became the centre of 'The Bloomsbury Group'. This informal collective of artists and writers which included Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry, exerted a powerful influence over early twentieth-century British culture. In 1912 Virginia married Leonard Woolf, a writer and social reformer. Three years later, her first novel The Voyage Out was published, followed by Night and Day (1919) and Jacob's Room (1922). These first novels show the development of Virginia Woolf's distinctive and innovative narrative style. It was during this time that she and Leonard Woolf founded The Hogarth Press with the publication of the co-authored Two Stories in 1917, hand-printed in the dining room of their house in Surrey. Between 1925 and 1931 Virginia Woolf produced what are now regarded as her finest masterpieces, from Mrs Dalloway (1925) to the poetic and highly experimental novel The Waves (1931). She also maintained an astonishing output of literary criticism, short fiction, journalism and biography, including the playfully subversive Orlando (1928) and A Room of One's Own (1929) a passionate feminist essay. This intense creative productivity was often matched by periods of mental illness, from which she had suffered since her mother's death in 1895. On 28 March 1941, a few months before the publication of her final novel, Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf committed suicide.

Review quote

"Virginia Woolf stands as the chief figure of Modernism in England, and must be included with Joyce and Proust in the realizaztion of experimental acheivements that has completely broken with tradition."-- The New York Times

Editorial reviews

Clarissa Dalloway spends a day in London reflecting on her life as she prepares for a party. Her reverie is set off by the imminence of her daughter's adulthood. This is a classic text on women and Virginia Woolf at her finest. Mrs Woolf's work was to an extent a conscious revolt against fiction based on over-precise chronicling of detailed events of which the Victorian novelists were such ardent exponents. She substituted the continuousness of experience and the imprecision of characters who take on different lights according to varying circumstances. Mrs Dalloway (1925), where everything wobbles under the changing light of a single day, is a satisfactory example of her technique. Her impressionism does not prevent the image of an early aeroplane pulling an advertising slogan across the London sky remaining one of the most vivid in the fiction of the 1920s. Review by Lord Jenkins of Hillhead, whose work includes 'The Chancellors' and 'A Life at the Centre' (Kirkus UK)