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A Moveable Feast

A Moveable Feast

Paperback Vintage Classics

By (author) Ernest Hemingway

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  • Publisher: VINTAGE
  • Format: Paperback | 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 190mm x 14mm | 141g
  • Publication date: 1 September 2012
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0099285045
  • ISBN 13: 9780099285045
  • Edition: 12000
  • Edition statement: Reissue.
  • Sales rank: 17,503

Product description

Hemingway's memories of his life as an unknown writer living in Paris in the twenties are deeply personal, warmly affectionate and full of wit. Looking back not only at his own much younger self, but also at the other writers who shared Paris with him - James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald - he recalls the time when, poor, happy and writing in cafes, he discovered his vocation. Written during the last years of Hemingway's life, his memoir is a lively and powerful reflection of his genius that scintillates with the romance of the city.

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Author information

Ernest Hemingway was born in Chicago in 1899, the second of six children. In 1917, he joined the Kansas City Star as a cub reporter. The following year, he volunteered as an ambulance driver on the Italian front, where he was badly wounded but decorated for his services. He returned to America in 1919, and married in 1921. In 1922 he reported on the Greco-Turkish war, then resigned from journalism to devote himself to fiction. He settled in Paris, associating with other expatriates like Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein. He was passionately involved with bullfighting, big-game hunting and deep-sea fishing. His direct and deceptively simple style spawned generations of imitators but no equals. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954, and died in 1961.

Review quote

"Reading A Moveable Feast is a little like sitting down to a banquet with a host of bohemian luminaries" Observer "A short, perfect book. Exquisite" Independent "Here is Hemingway at his best. No one has ever written about Paris in the nineteen twenties as well as Hemingway" New York Times "The first thing to say about the 'restored' edition so ably and attractively produced by Patrick and Sean Hemingway is that it does live up to its billing ... well worth having" -- Christopher Hitchens The Atlantic

Editorial reviews

What we've all been awaiting: the first of Hemingway's posthumous works he began in 1958 and finished in 1960. This is a memoir of his expatriate days in the twenties, and MacLeish's little poem about the young man with the panther good looks who whittled a style for his times in the sawmill attic in Paris comes to life here. What also comes to light is the "inside story," or the very personal revelations, parts of whicy may become a cause scandale. Not only is the Fitzgerald portrait ungenerous, but the disclosures of his sexual difficulties with Zelda are embarrassing. Miss Stein is also victimized, and there are allusions to puzzling perversities. Pound, Ford, Eliot, Lewis and Joyce are around and they are treated with affection, or affectionate malice. The best passages are the descriptive ones - fine writing with all the supple surety of Sun - of bookstalls, cafes, streets, the Seine, race tracks, and travel. And of course there's Hemingway on his wife Hadley, and Hemingway on Hemingway..... Mary McCarthy's famous attack on Salinger scored him for following Papa's special club of OK people (like him) versus the "others" (unlike him). The memoir has something of that snobbery and certain people may go after it accordingly. Still, whatever the indiscretions, it is an important work, a literary source from a master. There can be little doubt of its interest and attraction for many as a reprise of a now legendary time when Hemingway was young and happy and "invulnerable," and a place - well, "There is never any ending to Paris." (Kirkus Reviews)