The Moral of the Story

The Moral of the Story : Literature and Public Ethics

Edited by Henry T. Edmondson , Contributions by J. Patrick Dobel , Contributions by Henry T. Edmondson , Contributions by Gregory R. Johnson , Contributions by Peter Kalkavage , Contributions by Judith Lee Kissell , Contributions by Peter A. Lawler , Contributions by Alan Levine , Contributions by Daniel J. Mahoney , Contributions by Will Morrisey

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The contributors to The Moral of the Story, all preeminent political theorists, are unified by their concern with the instructive power of great literature. This thought-provoking combination of essays explores the polyvalent moral and political impact of classic world literatures on public ethics through the study of some of its major figures-including Shakespeare, Dante, Cervantes, Jane Austen, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, Robert Penn Warren, and Dostoevsky. Positing the uniqueness of literature's ability to promote dialogue on salient moral and intellectual virtues, editor Henry T. Edmonson III has culled together a wide-ranging exploration of such fundamental concerns as the abuse of authority, the nature of good leadership, the significance of "middle class virtues" and the needs of adolescents. This collection reinvigorates the study of classic literature as an endeavor that is not only personally intellectually satisfying, but also an inimitable and unique way to enrich public discourse.

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  • Hardback | 272 pages
  • 154.9 x 228.6 x 20.3mm | 453.6g
  • 20 Sep 2000
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD
  • English
  • Annotated
  • 073910148X
  • 9780739101483

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Author Information

Henry T. Edmondson III is Professor in the Department of Government at Georgia College & State University.

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Review quote

[A] noteworthy addition to the growing literature on the relationship between art and politics. American Political Science Review

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