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The Moor's Last Sigh

The Moor's Last Sigh

Paperback

By (author) Salman Rushdie

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  • Publisher: VINTAGE
  • Format: Paperback | 448 pages
  • Dimensions: 130mm x 208mm x 30mm | 318g
  • Publication date: 1 March 1998
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 009959241X
  • ISBN 13: 9780099592419
  • Illustrations note: geneal. table
  • Sales rank: 49,373

Product description

Moares 'Moor' Zogoiby is a 'high-born crossbreed', the last surviving scion of a dynasty of Cochinise spice merchants and crime lords. He is also a compulsive storyteller and an exile. As he travels a route that takes him from India to Spain, he leaves behind a labyrinthine tale of mad passions and volcanic family hatreds, of titanic matriarchs and their mesmerised offspring, of premature deaths and curses that strike beyond the grave. The Moor's Last Sigh is a spectacularly ambitious, funny, satirical and compassionate novel. It is a love song to a vanishing world, but also its last hurrah.

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Author information

Salman Rushdie is the author of eight novels, one collection of short stories, and four works of non-fiction, and the co-editor of The Vintage Book of Indian Writing. In 1993 Midnight's Children was judged to be the 'Booker of Bookers', the best novel to have won the Booker Prize in its first 25 years. The Moor's Last Sigh won the Whitbread Prize in 1995, and the European Union's Aristeion Prize for Literature in 1996. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres.

Review quote

"'A wonderful book' Independent on Sunday" "Salman Rushdie's greatest novel...held me in its thrall and provided the richest fictional experience of 1995" Sunday Times "Rushdie is still our most exhilaratingly inventive prose stylist, a writer of breathtaking originality" Financial Times "Endlessly inventive, witty, digressional and diverting" Observer

Editorial reviews

A huge, and hugely imaginative work, which confirmed Rushdie as one of this country's finest talents. Taking the form of a family saga, the novel concerns the vicissitudes of the Da Gama-Zogoiby dynasty, as they feud and fornicate, rebel and reconcile, across a century of wider conflict and decay, from the 1870s to the present day. The eponymous Moor is Moraes Zogoiby, sibling of Ina, Minnie and Mynah, heir to the family's millions and narrator of this tale of lost opportunities. Some readers will search for political allegory (sectarianism, bigotry and superstition are all strong themes) but most will simply relish the book and will celebrate Rushdie not as a political phenomenon but as a writer whose prose style bursts with the playful unconstrained possibilities of language. Lisa Jardine, the eminent historian, declared that it 'weaves an extraordinary story about Portuguese merchants, Indian family life and the 15th-century pepper trade which is at once surreal, captivating and yet astonishingly accurate in its perceptions of those early days of international trade between East and West.' (Kirkus UK)

Flap copy

Time Magazine's Best Book of the Year Booker Prize-winning author Salman Rushdie combines a ferociously witty family saga with a surreally imagined and sometimes blasphemous chronicle of modern India and flavors the mixture with peppery soliloquies on art, ethnicity, religious fanaticism, and the terrifying power of love. Moraes "Moor" Zogoiby, the last surviving scion of a dynasty of Cochinese spice merchants and crime lords, is also a compulsive storyteller and an exile. As he travels a route that takes him from India to Spain, he leaves behind a tale of mad passions and volcanic family hatreds, of titanic matriarchs and their mesmerized offspring, of premature deaths and curses that strike beyond the grave. "Fierce, phantasmagorical...a huge, sprawling, exuberant novel."--New York Times