Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis

Paperback

By (author) Franz Kafka, Introduction by Adam Thirlwell, Translated by Edwin Muir

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  • Publisher: VINTAGE
  • Format: Paperback | 240 pages
  • Dimensions: 110mm x 176mm x 46mm | 381g
  • Publication date: 1 February 1992
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0749399538
  • ISBN 13: 9780749399535
  • Sales rank: 47,347

Product description

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY ADAM THIRLWELL One morning, Gregor Samsa wakes up to find himself transformed into a giant insect. His family is understandably perturbed and he finds himself an outsider in his own home. In 'Metamorphosis' and the other famous stories included here, Kafka explores the confusing nature of human experience with sly wit and compelling originality.

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Author information

Franz Kafka (1883-1924) was born into a Jewish family in Prague. In 1906 he received a doctorate in jurisprudence, and for many years he worked a tedious job as a civil service lawyer investigating claims at the state Worker's Accident Insurance Institute. He never married, and published only a few slim volumes of stories during his lifetime. Meditation, a collection of sketches, appeared in 1912; The Stoker: A Fragment in 1913; The Metamorphosis in 1915; The Judgement in 1916; In the Penal Colony in 1919; and A Country Doctor in 1920. Only a few of his friends knew that Kafka was also at work on the great novels that were published after his death from tuberculosis: America, The Trial, and The Castle.

Review quote

"He is the greatest German writer of our time. Such poets as Rilke or such novelists as Thomas Mann are dwarfs or plaster saints in comparison to him" -- Vladimir Nabokov "I think of a Kafka story as a perfect work of literary art, as approachable as it is strange, and as strange as it is approachable" -- Michael Hofmann