• Meeting Place: The Human Encounter and the Challenge of Coexistence See large image

    Meeting Place: The Human Encounter and the Challenge of Coexistence (Paperback) By (author) Paul Carter

    $23.74 - Save $6.13 20% off - RRP $29.87 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 1 business day
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    Also available in...
    Hardback $72.92

    DescriptionIn this remarkable and often dazzling book, Paul Carter explores the conditions for sociability in a globalized future. He argues that we make many assumptions about communication but overlook barriers to understanding between strangers as well as the importance of improvisation in overcoming these obstacles to meeting. While disciplines such as sociology, legal studies, psychology, political theory, and even urban planning treat meeting as a good in its own right, they fail to provide a model of what makes meeting possible and worth pursuing: a yearning for encounter. The volume's central narrative--between Northern cultural philosophers and Australian societies--traverses the troubled history of misinterpretation that is characteristic of colonial cross-cultural encounter. As he brings the literature of Indigenous and non-Indigenous anthropological research into dialogue with Western approaches of conceptualizing sociability, Carter makes a startling discovery: that meeting may not be desirable and, if it is, its primary objective may be to negotiate a future of non-meeting. To explain the phenomenon of encounter, Carter performs it in differing scales, spaces, languages, tropes, and forms of knowledge, staging in the very language of the book what he calls "passages." In widely varying contexts, these passages posit the disjunction of Greco-Roman and Indigenous languages, codes, theatrics of power, social systems, and visions of community. In an era of new forms of technosocialization, Carter offers novel ways of presenting the philosophical dimensions of waiting, meeting, and non-meeting.


Other books

Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 11 of 11

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for Meeting Place

    Title
    Meeting Place
    Subtitle
    The Human Encounter and the Challenge of Coexistence
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Paul Carter
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 272
    Width: 140 mm
    Height: 216 mm
    Thickness: 20 mm
    Weight: 295 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780816685394
    ISBN 10: 0816685398
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: GEO
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S8.0
    BIC subject category V2: JHMC
    B&T Merchandise Category: TXT
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BISAC V2.8: PHI000000
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    BIC subject category V2: HP, JFS
    B&T General Subject: 750
    BIC subject category V2: RGC
    Ingram Subject Code: SO
    Libri: I-SO
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25200
    BISAC V2.8: SOC015000, SOC002010
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 304.2/3, 304.23
    LC subject heading: , , , , ,
    DC23: 304.2
    LC classification: GF50 .C37 2013
    LC subject heading: ,
    Illustrations note
    10 black and white illustrations
    Publisher
    University of Minnesota Press
    Imprint name
    University of Minnesota Press
    Publication date
    16 October 2013
    Publication City/Country
    Minnesota
    Author Information
    Paul Carter is professor of design (urbanism) at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia. He is the author of "The Road to Botany Bay: An Exploration of Landscape and History" (Minnesota, 2010).
    Review quote
    ""The Meeting Place", Carter's latest foray into colonial and postcolonial encounters of peoples, epistemologies, and longings, exposes what he foregrounds and reiterates as a 'meeting place' of desired belonging and social union. It is an imaginative, referentially capacious, formally demanding, as well as theoretically inventive book." --Rob Wilson, University of California, Santa Cruz