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    Meat: A Benign Extravagance (Paperback) By (author) Simon Fairlie, Foreword by Gene Logsdon

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    DescriptionMeat: A Benign Extravagance is a groundbreaking exploration of the difficult environmental, ethical and health issues surrounding the human consumption of animals. Garnering huge praise in the UK, this is a book that answers the question: should we be farming animals, or not? Not a simple answer, but one that takes all views on meat eating into account. It lays out in detail the reasons why we must indeed decrease the amount of meat we eat, both for the planet and for ourselves, and yet explores how different forms of agriculture--including livestock--shape our landscape and culture. At the heart of this book, Simon Fairlie argues that society needs to re-orient itself back to the land, both physically and spiritually, and explains why an agriculture that can most readily achieve this is one that includes a measure of livestock farming. It is a well-researched look at agricultural and environmental theory from a fabulous writer and a farmer, and is sure to take off where other books on vegetarianism and veganism have fallen short in their global scope.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Meat

    Title
    Meat
    Subtitle
    A Benign Extravagance
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Simon Fairlie, Foreword by Gene Logsdon
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 336
    Width: 178 mm
    Height: 251 mm
    Thickness: 20 mm
    Weight: 590 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781603583244
    ISBN 10: 1603583246
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27440
    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S3.0
    BIC E4L: SOC
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BIC subject category V2: TVH
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    B&T General Subject: 750
    Ingram Subject Code: SO
    Libri: I-SO
    BIC subject category V2: RNU, JFCV
    BISAC V2.8: SOC055000
    DC21: 179.3
    DC22: 179.3
    BISAC V2.8: TEC003020
    DC22: 179/.3
    B&T Approval Code: A70501800
    BIC subject category V2: TVF
    BISAC V2.8: TEC003070
    B&T Approval Code: A30010000
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: TS1955 .F35 2010
    Thema V1.0: JBCC4, TVF, TVH
    Edition statement
    New ed.
    Illustrations note
    index, bibliography
    Publisher
    Chelsea Green Publishing Company
    Imprint name
    Chelsea Green Publishing Company
    Publication date
    17 December 2010
    Author Information
    Simon Fairlie worked for 20 years variously as an agricultural labourer, vineworker, shepherd, fisherman, builder and stonemason before being ensnared by the computer in 1990. He was a co-editor of The Ecologist magazine for four years, before joining a community farm in 1994 where he managed the cows, pigs and a working horse for ten years. He now runs Chapter 7, an organization that provides planning advice to smallholders and other low income people in the countryside. He is also editor of The Land magazine, and earns a living by selling scythes. He is the author of Low Impact Development: Planning and People in a Sustainable Countryside (Jon Carpenter, 1996), and Meat: A Benign Extravagance.
    Review quote
    Permaculture Activist- "Simon Fairlie, a farmworker and editor of Britain's prestigious Ecologist magazine, has given us a wonderful treatise on the ecological niche and cultural history of the world's primary livestock animals: beef and dairy cattle, pigs, sheep, and poultry. There is more to this than retrospective, however. Fairlie's aim is to shed light on the current debate over the role of meat in the human diet, economy, and perhaps most importantly, the flows of carbon dioxide and methane from human activities that threaten to unhinge the climate. The value of this book is chiefly the well-argued case that it makes against both industrial forms of meat production and the folly of veganism as a universal dietary solution to animal cruelty and threats of climate change. Vegan eaters and farmers might well work and eat in a matrix of integrated livestock farming. - Fairlie is kind toward individual vegans but little social or ecological value is to be gained and much lost from expanding vegan dietary practices. A secondary and significant value of Meat is the careful explication it makes of the complementary roles of our familiar livestock animals in mixed farm production, a system far more likely to serve us well through the coming decades of energy descent than industrial agriculture. Erudite, well grounded in the author's farming experience, and delightfully written, this book recommends itself to all permaculture designers, and to every intelligent reader who has concerns for climate stability and a regenerative land use. It is more than a primer, offering an insightful examination of the central problems of agriculture itself, both past and present."