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    Me Talk Pretty One Day (Abacus) (Paperback) By (author) David Sedaris

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    DescriptionAnyone that has read NAKED and BARREL FEVER, or heard David Sedaris speaking live or on the radio will tell you that a new collection from him is cause for jubilation. His recent move to Paris from New York inspired these hilarious new pieces, including 'Me Talk Pretty One Day', about his attempts to learn French from a sadistic teacher who declares that 'every day spent with you is like having a caesarean section'. His family is another inspiration. 'You Can't Kill the Rooster' is a portrait of his brother, who talks incessant hip-hop slang to his bewildered father. And no one hones a finer fury in response to such modern annoyances as restaurant meals presented in ludicrous towers of food and cashiers with six-inch fingernails.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Me Talk Pretty One Day

    Title
    Me Talk Pretty One Day
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) David Sedaris
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 288
    Width: 126 mm
    Height: 196 mm
    Thickness: 22 mm
    Weight: 240 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780349113913
    ISBN 10: 0349113912
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: BIO
    BIC subject category V2: DNF
    Libri: ENGM1010
    BIC subject category V2: BM
    DC21: 818.5409
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T4.5A
    LC subject heading: , ,
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: AMER3710
    Ingram Theme: CULT/WEUROP
    DC22: 814.54
    Ingram Subject Code: HU
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET050
    Ingram Theme: CULT/FRANCE
    BISAC V2.8: LCO010000, HUM003000
    Thema V1.0: DNC, DNL
    Edition statement
    Revised ed.
    Publisher
    Little, Brown Book Group
    Imprint name
    Abacus
    Publication date
    01 February 2010
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    David Sedaris recently moved from New York to Paris. Raised in North Carolina, he has worked as a housecleaner and most famously, as a part-time elf for Macy's. Several of his plays have been produced, and his essays are featured regularly on BBC radio and in THE NEW YORKER and ESQUIRE.
    Review quote
    Still keeps me company like a party guest who's been asked to spend the night...His essays about living in Paris are full of piss and vinegar and achingly funny. Armistead Maupin Audaciously combining memoir, essay, and what has to be fiction, this fourth collection of short pieces offers pleasures normally to be found only in the best novels and the rare standup act that is actually funny. THE NEW YORKER He is, simply, very funny... refusing to find anything an unfit subject for humour. SUNDAY TIMES A sophisticatedly funny take on modern life. Treat yourself to this book. IRISH TIMES
    Review text
    The undisputed champion of the self-conscious and the self-deprecating returns with yet more autobiographical gems from his apparently inexhaustible cache (Naked, 1997, etc.). Sedaris at first mines what may be the most idiosyncratic, if innocuous, childhood since the McCourt clan. Here is father Lou, whos propositioned, via phone, by married family friend Mrs. Midland (Oh, Lou. It just feels so good to . . . talk to someone who really . . . understands). Only years later is it divulged that Mrs. Midland was impersonated by Lous 12-year-old daughter Amy. (Lou, to the pranksters relief, always politely declined Mrs. Midlands overtures.) Meanwhile, Mrs. Sedarissoon after shes put a beloved sick cat to sleepis terrorized by bogus reports of a miraculous new cure for feline leukemia, all orchestrated by her bitter children. Brilliant evildoing in this family is not unique to the author. Sedaris (also an essayist on National Public Radio) approaches comic preeminence as he details his futile attempts, as an adult, to learn the French language. Having moved to Paris, he enrolls in French class and struggles endlessly with the logic in assigning inanimate objects a gender (Why refer to Lady Flesh Wound or Good Sir Dishrag when these things could never live up to all that their sex implied?). After months of this, Sedaris finds that the first French-spoken sentiment hes fully understood has been directed to him by his sadistic teacher: Every day spent with you is like having a cesarean section. Among these misadventures, Sedaris catalogs his many bugaboos: the cigarette ban in New York restaurants (Im always searching the menu in hope that some courageous young chef has finally recognized tobacco as a vegetable); the appending of company Web addresses to television commercials (Who really wants to know more about Procter & Gamble?); and a scatological dilemma that would likely remain taboo in most households. Naughty good fun from an impossibly sardonic rogue, quickly rising to Twainian stature. (Kirkus Reviews)