• Marriage Law and Practice in the Long Eighteenth Century: A Reassessment See large image

    Marriage Law and Practice in the Long Eighteenth Century: A Reassessment (Cambridge Studies in English Legal History) (Hardback) By (author) Rebecca Probert

    $107.35 - Save $5.72 (5%) - RRP $113.07 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 4 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    DescriptionThis book uses a wide range of primary sources - legal, literary and demographic - to provide a radical reassessment of eighteenth-century marriage. It disproves the widespread assumption that couples married simply by exchanging consent, demonstrating that such exchanges were regarded merely as contracts to marry and that marriage in church was almost universal outside London. It shows how the Clandestine Marriages Act of 1753 was primarily intended to prevent clergymen operating out of London's Fleet prison from conducting marriages, and that it was successful in so doing. It also refutes the idea that the 1753 Act was harsh or strictly interpreted, illustrating the courts' pragmatic approach. Finally, it establishes that only a few non-Anglicans married according to their own rites before the Act; while afterwards most - save the exempted Quakers and Jews - similarly married in church. In short, eighteenth-century couples complied with whatever the law required for a valid marriage.


Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data

There are currently no reviews for Marriage Law and Practice in the Long Eighteenth Century.

You must be logged in and a registered user to add a review.

  • Create an account

    Fields marked * are required

    Please enter a password with at least six characters.