Mark Antony's Heroes: How the Third Gallica Legion Saved an Apostle and Created an Emperor

Mark Antony's Heroes: How the Third Gallica Legion Saved an Apostle and Created an Emperor

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By (author) Stephen Dando-Collins

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  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • Format: Hardback | 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 163mm x 236mm x 33mm | 499g
  • Publication date: 24 November 2006
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0471788996
  • ISBN 13: 9780471788997
  • Illustrations note: maps
  • Sales rank: 1,293,643

Product description

This fourth book in Dando-Collins's definitive history of Rome's legions tells the story of Rome's 3rd Gallica Legion, which put Vespasian on the throne and saved the life of the Christian apostle Paul. Named for their leader, Mark Antony, these common Roman soldiers, through their gallantry on the battlefield, reshaped the Roman Empire and aided the spread of Christianity throughout Europe.

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Author information

STEPHEN DANDO-COLLINS is the author of Caesar's Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome, Nero's Killing Machine: The True Story of Rome's Remarkable Fourteenth Legion, and Cleopatra's Kidnappers: How Caesar's Sixth Legion Gave Egypt to Rome and Rome to Caesar, all from Wiley. He is an Australian-born researcher, editor, and author who has spent the last three decades identifying and studying the individual legions of the Roman army of the late Republic and the empire of the Caesars.

Back cover copy

An enthralling look at the most formidable legion of the Roman Empire In "Mark Antony's Heroes," the fourth installment in the author's seminal histories of the legions of ancient Rome, Stephen Dando-Collins paints a vivid portrait of the 3rd Gallica Legion from the unique vantage point of the soldiers. Drawing on scores of classical texts, Dando-Collins tells the gripping story of a unit that made a name for itself under Mark Antony, only to watch its early glory fade and rise again. Dreaded by friend and foe alike, they used their muscle to install Herod the Great and Caesar Vespasian on their thrones. They made Rome's enemies from one side of the empire to the other dread their legion's name. They were renowned as the fearless servants of two Mark Antonys, saving the skin of Cleopatra's lover and making possible the meteoric career of Mark Antony Primus. By weaving together new information about the legionaries' lives with factual Roman military practices, Mark Antony's Heroes is a landmark in ancient military history.Praise for CAESAR'S LEGION"A unique and splendidly researched story, following the trials and triumphs of Julius Caesar's Legio X. . . . More than a mere unit account, it incorporates the history of Rome and the Roman army at the height of their power and gory glory. Many military historians consider Caesar's legion the world's most efficient infantry before the arrival of gunpowder. This book shows why. Written in readable, popular style, Caesar's Legion is a must for military buffs and anyone interested in Roman history at a critical point in European civilization." --T. R. Fehrenbach, author of "This Kind of War, Lone Star, and Comanches"

Flap copy

In this riveting book, fourth in the author's definitive histories of the legions of ancient Rome, Stephen Dando-Collins draws on his three decades of painstaking research into the Roman military to present the enthralling story of the indefatigable 3rd Gallica Legion. Carefully culling material from classical sources, Mark Antony's Heroes elegantly weaves together a goldmine of little-known facts and influences on the legion's wars, campaigns, battles, skirmishes, speeches, and dialogues, as well as the men of the legions of Rome.By a.d. 69, the men of the 3rd Gallica Legion had gained a reputation as fearsome fighters, even among their fellow Romans. They had recently slaughtered nine thousand heavily armored Sarmatian cavalry on an icy battlefield south of the Danube. The unit made a name for itself under Mark Antony, only to see its early glory fade. Then, bloodied and withdrawn from the fray, it turned its fortunes around and put an emperor on the throne--marching, ironically, behind another man named Mark Antony. Yet these formidable warriors are also credited with saving St. Paul's life, not once, but three times, allowing him to spread the Word in Europe, which allowed Christianity to flourish.During the first centuries b.c. and a.d., the 3rd Gallica Legion would defeat the dashing prince Pacorus and the opportunistic Quintus Labienus while retrieving Syria from the Parthians. It would allow King Herod to secure his throne in Judea and help Mark Antony survive his botched campaign against the Parthians. Thanks to the 3rd Gallica Legion, Corbulo regained Armenia for Rome, the Roxolani Sarmatians were thwarted from crossing the Danube for an entire century, two Jewish uprisings were put down, Vespasian became emperor of Rome, and the empire's stability and prosperity were restored. And, by saving the life of the Christian apostle Paul, the officers and men of the 3rd Gallica Legion gave the disciple as many as nine more years for his ministry.Covering some of the most graphic battle scenes contained in Dando-Collins's Roman legion books, Mark Antony's Heroes is an eye-opening account of the common men who helped make Rome great.

Table of contents

Atlas. Acknowledgments. Author's Note. I. Get Up and Fight! II. For Pompey, Caesar, and Antony. III. The Parthian Invasion. IV. Routing the Parthians. V. Putting King Herod on His Throne. VI. Mark Antony's Mistake. VII. The Bloody Retreat. VIII. The Sun-Worshipping 3rd. IX. Riot Duty in Jerusalem. X. Saving the Apostle Paul a Second Time. XI. To Caesar You Shall Go. XII. The Centurion's Decision. XIII. Cast Up on Malta. XIV. In Nero's Rome. XV. Fanning the Flames of Revolt. XVI. Victims of the Jewish Uprising. XVII. The Heroes of Ascalon. XVIII. The Execution of a Troublesome Jew. XIX. Blood for Blood. XX. Slaughtering the Sarmatians. XXI. To Italy, to Make an Emperor. XXII. Prelude to a Disaster. XXIII. The Bloodbath of Cremona. XXIV. Storming Rome. XXV. Thanks to the 3rd Gallica. Appendix A: Imperial Roman Military Ranks and Their Modern-Day Equivalents. Appendix B: The German Guard. Appendix C: Sources. Glossary. Index.