A Manual for Engineers and Steam Users; With Tables of Performance of the Harris-Corliss Engine. Duty of Pumping Engines, Economy of Boilers and Furnaces, Steam Boiler Explosions Strength of Materials

A Manual for Engineers and Steam Users; With Tables of Performance of the Harris-Corliss Engine. Duty of Pumping Engines, Economy of Boilers and Furnaces, Steam Boiler Explosions Strength of Materials

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By (author) John W Hill

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  • Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com
  • Format: Paperback | 24 pages
  • Dimensions: 189mm x 246mm x 1mm | 64g
  • Publication date: 29 June 2012
  • Publication City/Country: Miami Fl
  • ISBN 10: 1236582152
  • ISBN 13: 9781236582157
  • Illustrations note: black & white illustrations

Product description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...be conducted in such a manner that the performance of the boiler may be separated from that of the furnace; and conversely we should be able to estimate the performance of furnace, independent of the performance of boiler. It has been the custom, up to a very recent period, to estimate the efficiency of boilers upon the quantity of water pumped in. But all such tests, with our present knowledge, are worthless, as the primage is one of the most important factors in the problem. Every boiler should be designed to furnish saturated steam; and when the boiler is incompetent to do this, then a steam-chimney should be added, and the dryness limited to saturation, or a few degrees above. Furnaces using previously heated air for combustion, are to be preferred, when no loss of heat is occasioned in elevating the temperature of the air, Smoke-prevention, in furnaces burning bituminous coal, has long been a favorite scheme with inventors; but it is extremely doubtful if success in this direction will ever be attained. Smoke-prevention, while within the bounds of possibility, is beset by so many obstacles that the task of attempting it, is almost as much of an ignis fatuus as the mobile 4, erpetuum. The supposition that smoke is an evidence of imperfect combustion is only partially true, as many English experiments on furnaces show that the loss of efficiency is very sn%all with an intelligent working of the fires, and in many cases almost inappreciable. Chemical analysis of the products of combustion, of well designed steam boiler furnaces, properly worked, has shown that the percentage of carbonic oxide is small, and the proportion of free carbon too minute to be of any practical value. It is not difficult to construct a furnace that will give good results..

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