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    The Magic Mountain (Vintage Books) (Paperback) By (author) Thomas Mann, Translated by H.T. Lowe-Porter

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    DescriptionHans Castorp is 'a perfectly ordinary, if engaging young man' when he goes to visit his cousin in an exclusive sanatorium in the Swiss Alps. What should have been a three week trip turns into a seven year stay. Hans falls in love and becomes intoxicated with the ideas he hears at the clinic - ideas which will strain and crack apart in a world on the verge of the First World War.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Magic Mountain

    Title
    The Magic Mountain
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Thomas Mann, Translated by H.T. Lowe-Porter
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 752
    Width: 130 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 42 mm
    Weight: 460 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780749386429
    ISBN 10: 0749386428
    Classifications

    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.1
    BIC E4L: CLA
    BIC subject category V2: FC
    Libri: ENGM1010
    BIC subject category V2: FYT
    BIC E4L: TRA
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: DEUT3010
    DC22: 833.912
    BISAC V2.8: FIC000000
    LC subject heading: ,
    BISAC V2.8: FIC019000
    BIC subject category V2: FNS
    Thema V1.0: FBC, FYT
    Publisher
    VINTAGE
    Imprint name
    VINTAGE
    Publication date
    31 March 2011
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Thomas Mann was born in 1875 in Lubeck, of a line of prosperous and influential merchants. Mann was educated under the discipline of North German schoolmasters before working for an insurance office aged nineteen. During this time he secretly wrote his first tale, Fallen, and shortly afterwards he left the insurance office to study art and literature at the University of Munich. After a year in Rome he devoted himself exclusively to writing. He was only twenty-five when Buddenbrooks, his first major novel, was published. Before it was banned and burned by Hitler, it had sold over a million copies in Germany alone. His second great novel, The Magic Mountain, was published in 1924 and the first volume of his tetralogy Joseph and his Brothers in 1933. In 1929 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. In 1933 Thomas Mann left Germany to live in Switzerland. Then, after several previous visits, in 1938 he settled in the United States where he wrote Doctor Faustus and The Holy Sinner. Among the honours he recieved in the USA was his appointment as a Fellow of the Library of Congress. He revisited his native country in 1949 and returned to Switzerland in 1952, where The Black Swan and Confessions of Felix Krull were written and where he died in 1955.
    Review quote
    "Magnificent... a beautiful, feverish account of obsessive love" -- Jonathan Coe Guardian "Featuring lengthy debates between humanist freemasons and Jews-turned-Catholics, a long love-scene written entirely in French and a brilliant hallucinatory journey down the snowy slopes, it merits multiple readings. A novel for a lifetime not just a rainy afternoon" Guardian "A monumental writer" Sunday Telegraph "The greatest German novelist of the 20th century" Spectator "Mann is Germany's outstanding modern classic, a decadent representative of the tradition of Goethe and Schiller. With his famous irony, he was up there with Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Freud, holding together the modern world with a love of art and imagination to compensate for the emptiness left by social and religious collapse." Independent
    Review text
    A new translation of Mann's great 1924 novel, long acclaimed as a masterly synthesis of the intellectual history of early 20th-century Europe and for its prescient scrutiny of elements in the German national character that had, and would again, find expression in the calamitous form of the world war. Helen T. Lowe-Porter's original (1927) English version rendered with exemplary elegance the sonorous gravity of Mann's prose. This new one from Woods, twice the winner of PEN's Translation Prize, brilliantly showcases the tartness of his sophisticated characters' argumentative exchanges, but so emphasizes the amused judgmental irony of the novel's ever-present omniscient narrator that excessive attention is inadvertently focused on Mann's least attractive quality as a writer: his jocose, avuncular condescension. For all that, it's important to have a contemporary updating of a classic novel, and for its clarity and syntactical vigor alone, Woods's new translation may be considered an impressive success. (Kirkus Reviews)
    Back cover copy
    INTRODUCED BY ADAM FOULDS ‘A masterwork, unlike any other… a delight, comic and profound, a new form of language, a new way of seeing’ A.S. Byatt Hans Castorp is ‘a perfectly ordinary, if engaging young man’ when he goes to visit his cousin in an exclusive sanatorium in the Swiss Alps.What should have been a three week trip turns into a seven year stay. Hans falls in love and becomes intoxicated with the ideas he hears at the clinic - ideas which will strain and crack apart a world on the verge of the First World War. ‘Magnificent… a beautiful, feverish account of obsessive love’ Jonathan Coe, Guardian See also: Death in Venice and Other Stories