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A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

A Lover's Discourse: Fragments

Paperback

By (author) Professor Roland Barthes, Translated by Richard Howard, Foreword by Wayne Koestenbaum

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  • Publisher: Hill & Wang
  • Format: Paperback | 234 pages
  • Dimensions: 137mm x 203mm x 23mm | 227g
  • Publication date: 10 December 2010
  • Publication City/Country: New York, NY
  • ISBN 10: 0374532311
  • ISBN 13: 9780374532314
  • Edition statement: Translation
  • Sales rank: 30,349

Product description

"A Lover's Discourse," at its 1978 publication, was revolutionary: Roland Barthes made unprecedented use of the tools of structuralism to explore the whimsical phenomenon of love. Rich with references ranging from Goethe's "Werther "to Winnicott, from Plato to Proust, from Baudelaire to Schubert, "A Lover's Discourse "artfully draws a portrait in which every reader will find echoes of themselves.

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Author information

ROLAND BARTHES was born in 1915. A French literary theorist, philosopher, and critic, he influenced the development of schools of theory, including structuralism, semiotics, existentialism, social theory, Marxism, and post-structuralism. He died in 1980.

Review quote

"Barthes's work, along with that of Wilde and Valery, gives being an aesthete a good name . . . Defending the senses, he never betrayed the mind." --SUSAN SONTAG "Barthes's most popular and unusual performance as a writer is "A Lover's Discourse, " a writing out of the discourse of love. This language--primarily the complaints and reflections of the lover when alone, not exchanges of a lover with her or her partner--is unfashionable. Thought it is spoken by millions of people, diffused in our popular romances and television programs as well as in serious literature, there is no institution that explores, maintains, modifies, judges, repeats, and otherwise assumes responsibility for this discourse . . . Writing out the figures of a neglected discourse, Barthes surprises us in "A Lover's Discourse" by making love, in its most absurd and sentimental forms, an object of interest."--Jonathan Culler