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    The Love of a Good Woman (Vintage Books) (Paperback) By (author) Alice Munro

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    DescriptionAlice Munro has a genius for entering the lives of ordinary people and capturing the passions and contradictions that lie just below the surface. In this brilliant new collection she takes mainly the lives of women - unruly, ungovernable, unpredictable, unexpected, funny, sexy and completely recognisable - and brings their hidden desires bubbling to the surface. The love of a good woman is not as pure and virtuous as it seems: as in her title story it can be needy and murderous. Here are women behaving badly, leaving husbands and children, running off with unstuitable lovers, pushing everyday life to the limits, and if they don't behave badly, they think surprising and disturbing thoughts.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Love of a Good Woman

    Title
    The Love of a Good Woman
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Alice Munro
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 352
    Width: 129 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 22 mm
    Weight: 251 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780099287865
    ISBN 10: 0099287862
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: GEN
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 813.54
    BIC E4L: SST
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.2
    BIC subject category V2: FA, FYB
    DC22: FIC
    Libri: ENGM1010
    LC subject heading: ,
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Ingram Subject Code: FC
    Ingram Theme: APPR/AWARD
    Libri: KANA1510
    BISAC V2.8: FIC029000, FIC019000
    Thema V1.0: FBA, FYB
    Publisher
    VINTAGE
    Imprint name
    VINTAGE
    Publication date
    02 March 2000
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Winner of the Man Booker International Prize for 2009, Alice Munro is the author of eleven collections of stories, most recently The View from Castle Rock, and a novel, Lives of Girls and Women. She has received many awards and prizes, including three of Canada's Governor General's Literary Awards and two Giller Prizes, the Rea Award for the Short Story, the Lannan Literary Award, the W.H. Smith Book Award in the UK, the National Book Critics Circle Award in the US, and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for The Beggar Maid. Her stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, the Paris Review, and other publications, and her collections have been translated into thirteen languages. She lives with her husband in Clinton, Ontario, near Lake Huron in Canada.
    Review quote
    "Munro is at the height of her powers...a testimony to a great talent" Guardian "That Munro is a great writer of short stories should, by now, go without saying. She is also one of the two or three best writers of fiction (of any length) now alive. The title story of this collection is one of her masterpieces...a brilliant piece of story-telling, tautly-structured and exquisitely balanced" Sunday Times "A new collection of Alice Munro stories is a literary event that more and more of us look forward to, we are very unlikely to find a richer or rarer treat all year...the eight new stories in The Love of a Good Woman show this miraculous and truly great writer at the height of her powers...a perfect story collection" Scotland on Sunday "Alice Munro's stories...reward each pleasurable effort, as the best fiction always does...a Munro story has the depth and intricacy of a long novel, more than any other living writer in English...she can account for 20 years of a person's life in a single, telling paragraph, or even in a subtly placed phrase...The Love of a Good Woman is a superb, but unsettling, collection" Daily Telegraph "One of the finest short-story writers of our time...absorbing and brilliant" Observer
    Review text
    The Canadian Chekhov's ninth book (after her recent triumphs Friend of My Youth, 1990, and Open Secrets, 1994) contains eight long stories that resemble Munro's mature work in their tendency toward leisurely development and complex narrative. As always, their province is both the author's native Ontario and the experiential territory denoted by the title of an earlier volume, Lives of Girls and Women (1973). The inchoate understanding possessed by husbands and wives whose intimacies never fully accommodate their unshared histories, siblings who have inevitably endured (or imagined) imbalance and unfairness, parents and children unhinged by the emotional variations to which their one flesh is susceptible - all are central to these elaborately woven tales of people's disillusioning plunges into the depths of their own and others' lives. But this time around the stories seem overloaded, distended by successive disclosures that move us unconvincingly away from their thematic and structural centers. In "Save the Reaper," for instance, essential details about its characters' relationships are withheld for so long that we never empathize sufficiently with the harried, lonely grandmother whose momentary impulsiveness endangers her family and herself. "My Mother's Dream" reimagines from a daughter's perspective - and in almost ludicrously melodramatic terms - her mother's ordeal among her late husband's controlling family. "The Children stay" overemphatically delineates the moral unraveling of an adulterous wife who unwisely makes "the choice of fantasy." To be fair, a few of the stories are, even by Munro's high standards, exemplary: notably "Cortes Island," in which a bored housewife's vivid imagination may or may not have exaggerated incriminating facts about her odd landlords; and especially the fine title novella, about the death of a small-town optometrist, the extremities to which well-meaning ordinary people are driven, and the burden helplessly shouldered by a "practical nurse" (there's a lovely irony therein) caught between "Trying to ease people. Trying to be good" and telling what she wishes not to know. A mixed bag, then, through which we too often sense Munro straining to extend and intensify her stories. The unfortunate result is her weakest book yet. (Kirkus Reviews)
    Flap copy
    In eight new stories, a master of the form extends and magnifies her great themes--the vagaries of love, the passion that leads down unexpected paths, the chaos hovering just under the surface of things, and the strange, often comical desires of the human heart. Time stretches out in some of the stories: a man and a woman look back forty years to the summer they met--the summer, as it turns out, that the true nature of their lives was revealed. In others time is telescoped: a young girl finds in the course of an evening that the mother she adores, and whose fluttery sexuality she hopes to emulate, will not sustain her--she must count on herself. Some choices are made--in a will, in a decision to leave home--with irrevocable and surprising consequences. At other times disaster is courted or barely skirted: when a mother has a startling dream about her baby; when a woman, driving her grandchildren to visit the lakeside haunts of her youth, starts a game that could have dangerous consequences. The rich layering that gives Alice Munro's work so strong a sense of life is particularly apparent in the title story, in which the death of a local optometrist brings an entire town into focus--from the preadolescent boys who find his body, to the man who probably killed him, to the woman who must decide what to do about what she might know. Large, moving, profound--these are stories that extend the limits of fiction.