The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family

The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family

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By (author) Dave Pelzer

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Product description

As a child, Dave Pelzer was brutally beaten and starved by his mother. The world knew nothing of his living nightmare and he had nothing and no one to turn to. But his dreams kept him alive, dreams of someone taking care of him, loving him and calling him their son. Finally, his horrific plight could no longer be hidden from the outside world and Dave's life radically changed. THE LOST BOY is the harrowing, but ultimately uplifting, true story of a boy's journey through the foster-care system in search of a family to love. The continuation of Dave Pelzer's story is a moving sequel and inspirational read for all.

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Author information

Dave Pelzer is recognised as one of America's most effective and respected communicators. His unique accomplishments have garnered personal commendations from Ronald Reagan and George Bush. He has dedicated his life to helping others help themselves.

Editorial reviews

Pelzer was just 12 when he was taken into care. Over six years he evolved from an abused, terrified, guilt-ridden boy into an aggressive, troubled adolescent in and out of Juvenile Hall and, finally, to a mature and level-headed young Air Force cadet about to make his mark on the world. A truly remarkable story that is the emotional equivalent of a 'rags to riches' transformation, this is the second part of an autobiographical trilogy. Told in an even-handed, non-hysterical yet intensely personal style, this is one boy's search for that most vital yet intangible of things, a loving family. Desperate for acceptance, the young Pelzer will go to any lengths, including petty larceny and even vandalism to belong to a group that doesn't look down on him for that greatest of all sins, being a foster child. As his mother's appalling vindictiveness casts a dark shadow over his adolescent years, he is shuttled from one foster home to the next. Never quite fitting in, an oddity and an interloper, he could so easily have slipped into society's stereotypical niche and become the sort of delinquent foster children were thought to be. His struggle to become something different, something better, will have you crying and cheering at the same time. This is not a sentimental or egocentric book, but a fascinating glimpse into a strange and unsettling world that most of us, thankfully, will never have to visit. Although Pelzer is the central character, he readily admits that the real heroes are the many foster families who take in 'problem' children and give unselfishly of their time and love to help turn that child's life around. This is a powerful and moving tribute to those people. (Kirkus UK)