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    Lords of the Horizons: A History of the Ottoman Empire (Paperback) By (author) Jason Goodwin

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    DescriptionThe Ottoman Empire has exerted a long, strong pull on Western minds and hearts. For over six hundred years the Empire swelled and declined; rising from a dusty fiefdom in the foothills of Anatolia to a power which ruled over the Danube and the Euphrates with the richest court in Europe. But its decline was prodigious, protracted, and total. Lords of the Horizons charts the Ottoman Empire's swirling history; dramatic, detailed and alive - a journey, and a world all in one.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Lords of the Horizons

    Title
    Lords of the Horizons
    Subtitle
    A History of the Ottoman Empire
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Jason Goodwin
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 384
    Width: 128 mm
    Height: 194 mm
    Thickness: 32 mm
    Weight: 200 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780099994008
    ISBN 10: 0099994003
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15500
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.2
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: HBJF1
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1FB, 1DVT
    BIC subject category V2: HBJH
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1HB
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: HBTQ
    Libri: B-374
    BISAC V2.8: HIS003000, HIS026000
    DC21: 956.015
    BISAC V2.8: HIS000000
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: 1FB, 1HB, 1DVT
    Thema V1.0: NHD, NHH, NHG, NHTQ
    Publisher
    VINTAGE
    Imprint name
    VINTAGE
    Publication date
    12 July 1999
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Jason Godwin is a historian, journalist and travel writer. He has travelled extensively in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia and India; his first book, The Gunpowder Gardens: Travels through India and China in search of Tea, was shortlisted for the Thomas Cook Travel Book Awards, 1991, and his second, On Foot to the Golden Horn: A Walk to Istanbul, was the winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize, 1993. He lives in the country with his wife and two sons.
    Review quote
    "A fascinating read... a perfect companion for anyone who visits Turkey and wants to make sense of it and those countries it once ruled'" The Times "As plush as a Turkish carpet... Godwin weaves together the threads of barbarism and civilisation with dazzling panache" -- Piers Brendon Mail on Sunday "So rich, so detailed and so astonishing as to be a book of wonders in itself" -- Jan Morris Independent "Perhaps the most readable history ever written on anything" Time Out
    Review text
    A delightfully picaresque history, brimming with memorable anecdotes and outrageous personalities. English travel writer Goodwin (A Cup of Tea: Travels Through China and India in Search of Tea, 1991) guides us on a highly impressionistic journey. We begin in the foothills of Turkey, where the Ottoman Turks revered the horse and reveled in making war. (They also helped to destroy the Christian crusaders of the 14th century.) The Ottomans were Sunni Muslims, relatively tolerant of religious diversity. In 1453, under Sultan Mehmet, they seized Constantinople, making it their capital. Goodwin writes brilliantly about the siege of that Byzantine city, describing its complex defensive fortifications and how Mehmet breached them with a revolutionary weapon, the cannon. Under Suleyman the Magnificent, Ottoman power reached its zenith. Suleyman's army overran Belgrade in 1521 and later assaulted Vienna. Finally, the European powers united to stop the "infidel" Ottoman onslaught. In 1571, the Ottomans suffered their first major defeat at the Battle of Lepanto. Nevertheless, they consolidated their power in the Balkans, Egypt, Persia, Russia, and all over Central Asia. Goodwin argues convincingly that the key to Ottoman success, besides an obvious skill at war, was their open-mindedness regarding cultures and institutions: The Ottoman umbrella made room for Spanish Jews, Orthodox Greeks, Venetian merchants, Albanian tribesmen, Arab bedouins, and others. With the coming of the industrial revolution in Europe, however, the Ottomans fell behind. Palace intrigues, factional rivalries, military disloyalty, and nationalist rebellions in Greece and Egypt combined to sap the empire of its strength. Yet it survived, miraculously, into the 20th century, like some crazy old aunt locked in the attic. Throughout, Goodwin relishes the exotic, the bizarre, the picturesque. In explaining the decline of Ottoman military virtue, he cites Sultan Ibrahim, who overindulged in drink and the harem, where he "rode his girls like horses through rooms lined in fur." An elegantly written, thoroughly entertaining work of popular history. (Kirkus Reviews)