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    Look at Me (Corsair) (Paperback) By (author) Jennifer Egan

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    DescriptionReconstructive facial surgery after a car crash so alters Manhattan model Charlotte that, within the fashion world, where one's look is oneself, she is unrecognizable. Seeking a new image, Charlotte engages in an Internet experiment that may both save and damn her. As her story eerily converges with that of a plain, unhappy teenager - another Charlotte - it raises tantalizing questions about identity and reality in contemporary Western culture. Jennifer Egan's bold, innovative novel, demonstrating her virtuosity at weaving a spellbinding, ambitious tale with language that dazzles, captures the spirit of our times and offers an unsettling glimpse of the future.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Look at Me

    Title
    Look at Me
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Jennifer Egan
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 416
    Width: 130 mm
    Height: 192 mm
    Thickness: 34 mm
    Weight: 440 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781780330990
    ISBN 10: 1780330995
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: GEN
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.1
    BIC subject category V2: FA
    DC22: FIC
    Libri: ENGM1010
    DC22: 813.54
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: AMER3710
    Ingram Subject Code: FC
    BISAC V2.8: FIC000000
    Thema V1.0: FBA
    BIC E4L: GNR
    Publisher
    Constable and Robinson
    Imprint name
    Corsair
    Publication date
    15 September 2011
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Jennifer Egan is the author of the critically acclaimed A Visit from the Goon Squad, The Keep, The Invisible Circus, and the story collection Emerald City. Her stories have been published in The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, GQ, Zoetrope, All-Story, and Ploughshares, and her nonfiction appears frequently in The New York Times Magazine. She lives with her husband and sons in Brooklyn.
    Review quote
    ...a comic, richly imagined, and stunningly written exploration of the American obsession with self-invention. New Yorker Brilliantly unnerving... A haunting, sharp, splendidly articulate novel. The New York Times Egan limns the mysteries of human identity and the stranglehold our image-obsessed culture has on us all in this complicated and wildly ambitious novel. Newsweek Ambitious, swiftly paced... Egan writes with such shimmering elan that it?s easy to follow her cast on its journey. The Wall Street Journal Dark, hugely ambitious... As riveting as a roadside wreck and noxiously, scathingly funny. Elle Egan's ability to move with ease between sincerity and satire sets Look at Me apart... Her authentic-feeling details give a sense of unusual immediacy. Vogue Prescient and provocative... The characters ... jump from the pages and dare you to care about them... The prose is crisp and precise... The pieces fit together at the end with a satisfying click. Philadelphia Inquirer Enjoyable and promising. Financial Times After the success of Egan's 2011 Pulitzer-winning A Visit From The Goon Squad, this satire of identity and fame in modern culture is another wildly inventive and meticulously crafted piece of brilliance. Stylist Sharp, clever, complex... I can't do this 514-page novel justice in 242 words. It's funny and serious, dry, sly and wry. The writing is as pin-sharp as the perceptions. Read it. Independent on Sunday A prescient, pre-9/11 study of a society drowning in contrivances. The Pulse
    Flap copy
    At the start of this edgy and ambitiously multilayered novel, a fashion model named Charlotte Swenson emerges from a car accident in her Illinois hometown with her face so badly shattered that it takes eighty titanium screws to reassemble it. She returns to New York still beautiful but oddly unrecognizable, a virtual stranger in the world she once effortlessly occupied. With the surreal authority of a David Lynch, Jennifer Egan threads Charlotte's narrative with those of other casualties of our infatuation with the image. There's a deceptively plain teenaged girl embarking on a dangerous secret life, an alcoholic private eye, and an enigmatic stranger who changes names and accents as he prepares an apocalyptic blow against American society. As these narratives inexorably converge, Look at Me becomes a coolly mesmerizing intellectual thriller of identity and imposture.