Look at Me

Look at Me

Paperback

By (author) Jennifer Egan

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  • Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell
  • Format: Paperback | 544 pages
  • Dimensions: 135mm x 203mm x 28mm | 885g
  • Publication date: 8 October 2002
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0385721358
  • ISBN 13: 9780385721356
  • Edition statement: Reprint
  • Sales rank: 168,571

Product description

At the start of this edgy and ambitiously multilayered novel, a fashion model named Charlotte Swenson emerges from a car accident in her Illinois hometown with her face so badly shattered that it takes eighty titanium screws to reassemble it. She returns to New York still beautiful but oddly unrecognizable, a virtual stranger in the world she once effortlessly occupied. With the surreal authority of a David Lynch, Jennifer Egan threads Charlotte’s narrative with those of other casualties of our infatuation with the image. There’s a deceptively plain teenaged girl embarking on a dangerous secret life, an alcoholic private eye, and an enigmatic stranger who changes names and accents as he prepares an apocalyptic blow against American society. As these narratives inexorably converge, Look at Me becomes a coolly mesmerizing intellectual thriller of identity and imposture.

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Author information

Jennifer Egan is the author of "The Invisible Circus" and the story collection "Emerald City." Her stories have been published in such magazines as "The New Yorker, Harper's, GQ, Zoetrope," and "Ploughshares," and her nonfiction appears frequently in "The New York Times Magazine." Egan lives with her husband and son in Brooklyn. For further information about Jennifer Egan, visit her Web site at www.jenniferegan.com.

Review quote

"Brilliantly unnerving. . . . A haunting, sharp, splendidly articulate novel."""-"The New York Times" "Comic, richly imagined, and stunningly written. . . . An energetic, unorthodox, quintessentially American vision of America." -"The New Yorker" ""Look at Me" is so engrossing, energetic, sharp, and funny, it reminded me of Ralph Ellison's masterpiece, "Invisible Man."" -Maureen Corrigan, "Fresh Air" (NPR) "Arresting. . . . "Look at Me "is the real thing-brave, honest, unflinching. [It] is itself a mirror in which we can clearly see the true face of the times in which we live." -Francine Prose, "The New York Observer " "Egan limns the mysteries of human identity and the stranglehold our image-obsessed culture has on us all in this complicated and wildly ambitious novel." -"Newsweek" "Intriguing. . . . An unlikely blend of tabloid luridness and brainy cultural commentary. . . . The novel's uncanny prescience gives "Look at Me "a rare urgency." -"Time" "Egan has created some compelling characters and written provocative meditations on our times. . . . [She] has captured our culture in its edge-city awfulness." -"The Washington Post Book World" ""Look at Me" is a complicated novel . . . but the questions it raises are worth following a lifetime of labyrinths toward the answers." -"Los Angeles Times" "Ambitious, swiftly paced. . . . Egan writes with such shimmering elan that it's easy to follow her cast on its journey." -"The Wall Street Journal" "Prescient and provocative. . . . The characters . . . jump from the pages and dare you to care about them. . . . The prose is crisp and precise. . . . The pieces fit together at the end with a satisfying click." -"Philadelphia Inquirer" "Impressive. . . . Few recent books have so eloquently demonstrated how often fiction, in its visionary form, speaks of truth." -"Salon.com" ""Look at Me "makes us think about our trust in the images that bombard us, an

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At the start of this edgy and ambitiously multilayered novel, a fashion model named Charlotte Swenson emerges from a car accident in her Illinois hometown with her face so badly shattered that it takes eighty titanium screws to reassemble it. She returns to New York still beautiful but oddly unrecognizable, a virtual stranger in the world she once effortlessly occupied. With the surreal authority of a David Lynch, Jennifer Egan threads Charlotte's narrative with those of other casualties of our infatuation with the image. There's a deceptively plain teenaged girl embarking on a dangerous secret life, an alcoholic private eye, and an enigmatic stranger who changes names and accents as he prepares an apocalyptic blow against American society. As these narratives inexorably converge, Look at Me becomes a coolly mesmerizing intellectual thriller of identity and imposture.