Look to Windward

Look to Windward

Paperback

By (author) Iain M. Banks

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  • Publisher: Orbit
  • Format: Paperback | 416 pages
  • Dimensions: 124mm x 206mm x 32mm | 322g
  • Publication date: 2 August 2001
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 1841490598
  • ISBN 13: 9781841490595
  • Sales rank: 9,224

Product description

It was one of the less glorious incidents of a long-ago war. It led to the destruction of two suns and the billions of lives they supported. Now, eight hundred years later, the light from the first of those ancient mistakes has reached the Culture Orbital, Masaq'. The light from the second may not. 'Confirms Banks as the standard by which the rest of SF is judged' GUARDIAN 'In terms of sheer storytelling prowess and verve, Look to Windward is a work of genius' SFX 'A great book' NEW SCIENTIST

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Author information

Iain Banks came to widespread and controversial public notice with the publication of his first novel, THE WASP FACTORY, in 1984. He has since gained enormous popular and critical acclaim for both his mainstream and his science fiction novels.

Review quote

In terms of sheer storytelling prowess and verve, LOOK TO WINDWARD is a work of genius SFX A great book NEW SCIENTIST Banks keeps ratcheting up the suspense GUARDIAN A mordant wit, a certain savagery and a wild imagination MAIL ON SUNDAY

Editorial reviews

The Culture is back - and this time, it's personal. It has been argued that the Culture is a 'post-socialist' society and it is certainly interesting to consider how the author's conception of this perfect world managed by the machines has become more dissatisfied and questioning. Just like its real-world equivalent (Banks is a staunch left-winger and, one might suppose, less than impressed with Blairism) it moves ever further from its ideals. For the first time in this series, a Utopia which was always slightly spooky takes on a darker aspect. Could a rogue Mind really be responsible for the deliberate destruction of an entire planet? Is the information-rich society starving for a lack of truth? As ever, don't read Banks for any straight answers; simply revel in the questions he raises. Overlaying the ideas, of course, is the action. Banks again displays his ability to weave multiple narrative threads into a thrilling whole. He skilfully varies both the pace and the mood of his writing and is particularly strong on characterization. Look to Windward is a welcome addition to the Culture canon, and will please both the novice and the die-hard fan alike. (Kirkus UK)