Look Homeward, Angel
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Look Homeward, Angel : A Story of the Buried Life

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Description

The stunning, classic coming-of-age novel written by one of America's foremost Southern writers A legendary author on par with William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Wolfe published "Look Homeward, Angel," his first novel, about a young man's burning desire to leave his small town and tumultuous family in search of a better life, in 1929. It gave the world proof of his genius and launched a powerful legacy. The novel follows the trajectory of Eugene Gant, a brilliant and restless young man whose wanderlust and passion shape his adolescent years in rural North Carolina. Wolfe said that "Look Homeward, Angel" is "a book made out of my life," and his largely autobiographical story about the quest for a greater intellectual life has resonated with and influenced generations of readers, including some of today's most important novelists. Rich with lyrical prose and vivid characterizations, this twentieth-century American classic will capture the hearts and imaginations of every reader.

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Product details

  • Paperback | 512 pages
  • 134.62 x 200.66 x 30.48mm | 476.27g
  • Scribner Book Company
  • New York, NY, United States
  • English
  • 0743297318
  • 9780743297318
  • 100,948

Review quote

"As so many other American boys had before and have since, I discovered a version of myself in "Look Homeward, Angel," and I became intoxicated with the elevated, poetic prose." -- Robert Morgan, author of "Gap Creek"

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Review Text

"In 1949, when I was sixteen, I stumbled on Thomas Wolfe, who died at thirty-eight in 1938, and who made numerous adolescents aside from me devotees of literature for life. In Wolfe, everything was heroically outsized, whether it was the voracious appetite for experience of Eugene Gant, the hero of his first two novels, or of George Webber, the hero of his last two. The hero's loneliness, his egocentrism, his sprawling consciousness gave rise to a tone of elegiac lyricism that was endlessly sustained by the raw yearning for an epic existence - for an epic American existence. And, in those postwar years, what imaginative young reader didn't yearn for that?" Philip Roth

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