Look Back in Anger: A Play in Three Acts

Look Back in Anger: A Play in Three Acts

Paperback

By (author) John Osborne

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  • Publisher: Faber & Faber Plays
  • Format: Paperback | 112 pages
  • Dimensions: 126mm x 192mm x 10mm | 100g
  • Publication date: 1 December 2001
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0571038484
  • ISBN 13: 9780571038480
  • Sales rank: 17,010

Product description

In 1956 John Osborne's Look Back in Anger changed the course of English theatre. 'Look Back in Anger presents post-war youth as it really is. To have done this at all would be a significant achievement; to have done it in a first play is a minor miracle. All the qualities are there, qualities one had despaired of ever seeing on stage - the drift towards anarchy, the instinctive leftishness, the automatic rejection of "official" attitudes, the surrealist sense of humour...the casual promiscuity, the sense of lacking a crusade worth fighting for and, underlying all these, the determination that no one who dies shall go unmourned.' Kenneth Tynan, Observer, 13 May 1956 'Look Back in Anger...has its inarguable importance as the beginning of a revolution in the British theatre, and as the central and most immediately influential expression of the mood of its time, the mood of the "angry young man".' John Russell Taylor

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Author information

John Osborne was born in London in 1929. His plays include Look Back in Anger (1956), The Entertainer (1957), Luther (1961), Inadmissible Evidence (1964), and A Patriot for Me (1966). Both Look Back in Anger and The Entertainer were adapted for film, and in 1963 Osborne won an Academy Award for his screenplay for Tom Jones. John Osborne died on 24 December 1994.

Review quote

'In 1956 John Osborne's Look Back in Anger changed the course of English theatre. Look Back in Anger presents post-war youth as it really is. To have done this at all would be a significant achievement; to have done it in a first play is a minor miracle. All the qualities are there, qualities one had despaired of ever seeing on stage - the drift towards anarchy, the instinctive leftishness, the automatic rejection of "official" attitudes, the surrealist sense of humour...the casual promiscuity, the sense of lacking a crusade worth fighting for and, underlying all these, the determination that no one who dies shall go unmourned.' Kenneth Tynan, Observer