Life by the Numbers

Life by the Numbers

By (author) Keith J. Devlin

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A lively, visually striking introduction to the remarkable ways math shapes our lives Life by the Numbers is the exclusive companion volume to the PBS series

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  • Hardback | 214 pages
  • 195.8 x 240 x 22.1mm | 789.26g
  • 01 Apr 1998
  • John Wiley and Sons Ltd
  • John Wiley & Sons Inc
  • New York
  • English
  • illustrations (chiefly colour) facsimiles (some colour), colour maps, music, portraits (some colour)
  • 0471240443
  • 9780471240440

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Author Information

KEITH DEVLIN is a mathematician and the Dean of the School of Science of St. Mary's College, as well as a Senior Researcher at Stanford University's Center for the Study of Language and Information. He is the author of the popular books Mathematics: The New Golden Age, Mathematics: The Science of Patterns, and Goodbye, Descartes (Wiley).

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Review quote

"Not in many, many years have I seen a book nearly as instructive, enlightening, and sheer fun about the beauty of mathematics. "Life by the Numbers" is truly superb."--Amir Aczel, author of "Fermat's Last Theorem""A beautiful book. . . . The aim is not to teach but to entertain, and it succeeds. The view that mathematics is dull is replaced by an image of how math can be both interesting and useful, if not all-powerful."--"New Scientist"""Life by the Numbers" provides a fascinating and readable account of many of the ways in which mathematical ideas find application in the world around us. Keith Devlin is to be congratulated for bringing these ideas so accessibly to the public at large."--Sir Roger Penrose, author of "The Emperor's New Mind"A recent article entitled "Get smart by getting some of these books" ran by The Associated Press in newspapers nationwide. "Keith Devlin's LIFE BY THE NUMBERS shows you how to look at math in a wider perspective, observing how it affects e

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Review text

Devlin argues that conventional logic and maths will never be able to describe the way the mind works - hence his title. His variation on the theme is relatively short. It is also extremely accessible, and he makes a convincing case that the image of the mind as a 'logic machine' is mistaken. People trying to build thinking machines will hate it; the non-specialist will be enthralled by this different perspective on how it works. (Kirkus UK)

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