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    The Library at Night (Paperback) By (author) Alberto Manguel

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    DescriptionInspired by the process of creating a library for his fifteenth-century home near the Loire in France, Alberto Manguel, the acclaimed writer on books and reading, has taken up the subject of libraries. 'Libraries', he says, 'have always seemed to me pleasantly mad places, and for as long as I can remember I've been seduced by their labyrinthine logic'. In this personal, deliberately unsystematic, and wide-ranging book, he offers a captivating meditation on the meaning of libraries. "Manguel", a guide of irrepressible enthusiasm, conducts a unique library tour that extends from his childhood bookshelves to the 'complete' libraries of the Internet, from Ancient Egypt and Greece to the Arab world, from China and Rome to Google.He ponders the doomed library of Alexandria as well as the personal libraries of Charles Dickens, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. He recounts stories of people who have struggled against tyranny to preserve freedom of thought - the Polish librarian who smuggled books to safety as the Nazis began their destruction of Jewish libraries; the Afghani bookseller who kept his store open through decades of unrest. Oral 'memory libraries' kept alive by prisoners, libraries of banned books, the imaginary library of Count Dracula, the library of books never written - Manguel illuminates the mysteries of libraries as no other writer could. With scores of wonderful images throughout, "The Library at Night" is a fascinating voyage through Manguel's mind, memory, and vast knowledge of books and civilizations.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Library at Night

    Title
    The Library at Night
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Alberto Manguel
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 384
    Width: 140 mm
    Height: 229 mm
    Thickness: 28 mm
    Weight: 476 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780300151305
    ISBN 10: 0300151306
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: JFCX
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    BIC subject category V2: GL
    BISAC V2.8: HIS037000, LIT007000
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    Libri: I-LC
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S3.7
    BIC E4L: LIB
    B&T General Subject: 495
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    B&T Approval Code: A28400000
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC22: 020
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27340
    LC subject heading:
    Abridged Dewey: 027
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 027
    B&T Approval Code: A29180000
    LC subject heading:
    LC classification: Z721 .M25 2009
    Thema V1.0: JBCC9, GL
    Illustrations note
    76 black-&-white illustrations
    Publisher
    Yale University Press
    Imprint name
    Yale University Press
    Publication date
    28 April 2009
    Publication City/Country
    New Haven
    Author Information
    Alberto Manguel is an internationally acclaimed anthologist, translator, essayist, novelist, and editor, and the author of several award-winning books, including A Dictionary of Imaginary Places and A History of Reading. A native of Buenos Aires, he lives in France.
    Review quote
    "'... crowded with memorable tales of reading as rescue, as solace, as liberation, in times of want, fear or tyranny... The Library at Night revels in the physical pleasure of drifting and dipping through the Gutenberg galaxy of ink-on-paper books.' Boyd Tonkin interview with Alberto Manguel, The Independent 'Books jump out of their jackets when Manguel opens them and dance in delight as they make contact with his ingenious, voluminous brain. He is not the keeper of a silent cemetery, but a master of bibliographical revels.' Peter Conrad, The Observer"