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    Jerusalem (Ebury Press) (Hardback) By (author) Yotam Ottolenghi, By (author) Sami Tamimi

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    DescriptionYotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi are the men behind the bestselling Ottolenghi: The Cookbook. Their chain of restaurants is famous for its innovative flavours, stylish design and superb cooking. At the heart of Yotam and Sami's food is a shared home city: Jerusalem. Both were born there in the same year, Sami on the Arab east side and Yotam in the Jewish west. Nearly 30 years later they met in London, and discovered they shared a language, a history, and a love of great food. Jerusalem sets 100 of Yotam and Sami's inspired, accessible recipes within the cultural and religious melting pot of this diverse city. With culinary influences coming from its Muslim, Jewish, Arab, Christian and Armenian communities and with a Mediterranean climate, the range of ingredients and styles is stunning. From recipes for soups (spicy frikkeh soup with meatballs), meat and fish (chicken with caramelized onion and cardamom rice, sea bream with harissa and rose), vegetables and salads (spicy beetroot, leek and walnut salad), pulses and grains (saffron rice with barberries and pistachios), to cakes and desserts (clementine and almond syrup cake), there is something new for everyone to discover. Packed with beautiful recipes and with gorgeous photography throughout, Jerusalem showcases sumptuous Ottolenghi dishes in a dazzling setting.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Jerusalem

    Title
    Jerusalem
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Yotam Ottolenghi, By (author) Sami Tamimi
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 320
    Width: 203 mm
    Height: 278 mm
    Thickness: 30 mm
    Weight: 1,386 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780091943745
    ISBN 10: 0091943744
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: FOO
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1FBH
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T16.1
    BIC subject category V2: WB
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 14540
    BIC subject category V2: WBN
    Libri: ENGM3400, KOCH3190
    LC subject heading: ,
    BIC subject category V2: 1FBH
    BISAC V2.8: CKB031000, CKB093000
    Libri: ISRA5200, JUDE2027
    DC23: 641.595694
    LC subject heading: ,
    Thema V1.0: WBN
    Illustrations note
    col. Illustrations
    Publisher
    Ebury Press
    Imprint name
    Ebury Press
    Publication date
    06 September 2012
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Yotam Ottolenghi completed a Masters degree in philosophy and literature whilst working on the news desk of an Israeli daily, before coming to London in 1997. He started as an assistant pastry chef at the Capital and then worked at Kensington Place, Launceston Place, Maison Blanc and Baker and Spice, before starting his own eponymous group of restaurants/food shops, with branches in Notting Hill, Islington, Belgravia and Kensington. He opened the restaurant NOPI in Piccadilly in 2011. Sami Tamimi became head chef at Lilith in Tel Aviv in 1989, and moved to London in 1997 where he set up the traiteur section at Baker & Spice. It was here that he met Yotam and he has since worked as head chef at Ottolenghi.
    Review quote
    "a magical feast" BBC Good Food Magazine "Jerusalem works both as a recipe book and as a touching tribute to (Yotam Ottolenghi's) war-torn native city" The Telegraph Magazine "A complicated love letter to a city...a memorable book that has as much to do with friendship as with food" The Guardian "Jerusalem will dominate dinner parties for the next year through its deceptive and inviting simplicity" The Financial Times "'(A) celebration of the complex currents that shaped Jerusalem's culinary, as well as political, history" The Sunday Telegraph