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    Invisible Man (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback) By (author) Ralph Ellison, Introduction by John Callahan

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    DescriptionThe lives of countless millions are evoked in Ralph Ellison's superb portrait of a generation of black Americans, "Invisible Man". This "Penguin Modern Classics" edition includes an introduction by John F. Callahan, as well as an introduction by the author. Ralph Ellison's blistering and impassioned first novel tells the extraordinary story of a man invisible 'simply because people refuse to see me'. Published in 1952 when American society was in the cusp of immense change, the powerfully depicted adventures of Ellison's invisible man - from his expulsion from a Southern college to a terrifying Harlem race riot - go far beyond the story of one individual. As John Callahan says, 'In an extraordinary imaginative leap, he hit upon a single word for the different yet shared condition of African Americans, Americans, and, for that matter, the human individual in the twentieth century and beyond.' This edition includes Ralph Ellison's introduction to the thirtieth anniversary edition of "Invisible Man", a fascinating account of the novel's seven-year gestation. Ralph Waldo Ellison (1914-94), named for the poet Emerson, was born in Oklahoma. At the age of nineteen he won a scholarship to study music at Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute. In 1936 he went to New York, where he met the writers Langston Hughes and Richard Wright; shortly afterwards his stories and articles began to appear in magazines and journals. After the Second World War Ellison was awarded a Rosenwald Fellowship, allowing him to concentrate on the composition of "Invisible Man" (1952), which won the National Book Award and established Ellison as a major figure in twentieth-century fiction. If you enjoyed "Invisible Man", you might like E.L. Doctorow's "The Book of Daniel", also available in "Penguin Modern Classics".


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  • Full bibliographic data for Invisible Man

    Title
    Invisible Man
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Ralph Ellison, Introduction by John Callahan
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 624
    Width: 128 mm
    Height: 196 mm
    Thickness: 26 mm
    Weight: 458 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780141184425
    ISBN 10: 0141184426
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: GEN
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.1
    LC subject heading:
    DC21: 813.54
    BIC subject category V2: FA
    Libri: ENGM1010
    LC subject heading: , ,
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: AMER3710
    BISAC V2.8: FIC004000
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    Thema V1.0: FBA
    Publisher
    Penguin Books Ltd
    Imprint name
    PENGUIN CLASSICS
    Publication date
    01 October 2007
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    INVISIBLE MAN established Ralph Ellison as the author of one of the most important and influential American novels of the twentieth century. He is remembered as a writer who captured a true sense of the African-American experience. JUNETEENTH joins INVISIBLE MAN and FLYING HOME & OTHER STORIES on the Penguin Modern Classics list.
    Review text
    "An extremely powerful story of a young Southern Negro, from his late high school days through three years of college to his life in Harlem. His early training prepared him for a life of humility before white men, but through injustices- large and small, he came to realize that he was an "invisible man". People saw in him only a reflection of their preconceived ideas of what he was, denied his individuality, and ultimately did not see him at all. This theme, which has implications far beyond the obvious racial parallel, is skillfully handled. The incidents of the story are wholly absorbing. The boy's dismissal from college because of an innocent mistake, his shocked reaction to the anonymity of the North and to Harlem, his nightmare experiences on a one-day job in a paint factory and in the hospital, his lightning success as the Harlem leader of a communistic organization known as the Brotherhood, his involvement in black versus white and black versus black clashes and his disillusion and understanding of his invisibility- all climax naturally in scenes of violence and riot, followed by a retreat which is both literal and figurative. Parts of this experience may have been told before, but never with such freshness, intensity and power. This is Ellison's first novel, but he has complete control of his story and his style. Watch it. (Kirkus Reviews)