The Invention of Wings

The Invention of Wings

Book rating: 04 Paperback Tinder Press

By (author) Sue Monk Kidd

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  • Publisher: Tinder Press
  • Format: Paperback | 384 pages
  • Dimensions: 152mm x 232mm x 28mm | 520g
  • Publication date: 7 January 2014
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 1472212746
  • ISBN 13: 9781472212740
  • Sales rank: 4,700

Product description

The No. 1 New York Times bestseller. THE INVENTION OF WINGS by Sue Monk Kidd was selected as an Oprah Book Club 2.0 pick on December 10, 2013. From the celebrated author of the international bestseller The Secret Life of Bees comes an extraordinary novel about two exceptional women. Sarah Grimke is the middle daughter. The one her mother calls difficult and her father calls remarkable. On Sarah's eleventh birthday, Hetty 'Handful' Grimke is taken from the slave quarters she shares with her mother, wrapped in lavender ribbons, and presented to Sarah as a gift. Sarah knows what she does next will unleash a world of trouble. She also knows that she cannot accept. And so, indeed, the trouble begins ...A powerful, sweeping novel, inspired by real events, and set in the American Deep South in the nineteenth century, THE INVENTION OF WINGS evokes a world of shocking contrasts, of beauty and ugliness, of righteous people living daily with cruelty they fail to recognise; and celebrates the power of friendship and sisterhood against all the odds.

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Author information

Sue Monk Kidd is the award-winning and bestselling author of the novels THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES and THE MERMAID CHAIR. She is also the author of several acclaimed memoirs, including the New York Times bestseller TRAVELLING WITH POMEGRANATES, written with her daughter Ann Kidd Taylor.

Customer reviews

By Marianne Vincent 10 Jun 2014 4

The Invention of Wings is the third novel by bestselling American author, Sue Monk Kidd. In it, Kidd takes the bare facts surrounding Charleston's famous (and infamous) 19th century abolitionist/emancipist sisters, Sarah and Angelina Grimke, and, as she puts it, grafts fiction onto truth to weave a fascinating and inspirational account of early abolitionism in America. Kidd employs two narrators: Sarah Grimke, and the slave she is given by her mother (and attempts to free) on her eleventh birthday, Hetty Handful Grimke. From this starting point, the contrast in their lives as they grow up is starkly illustrated. Even at the tender age of eleven, Sarah knew slavery was wrong, but it was years later before she "saw then what I hadn't seen before, that I was very good at despising slavery in the abstract, in the removed and anonymous masses, but in the concrete, intimate flesh of the girl beside me, I'd lost the ability to be repulsed by it. I'd grown comfortable with the particulars of evil. There's a frightful muteness that dwells at the center of all unspeakable things, and I had found my way into it." Handful's narration consistently brings things into perspective: "White folks think you care about everything in the world that happens to them, every time they stub their toe." Kidd populates her novel with character both real and fictitious: Denmark Vesey, charismatic and seditious; Charlotte, loving and determined; Mary, cruel and unpredictable. Sewing and quilts, the spirit tree, stuttering, blackbirds and Quakers all have their part to play. Through all that life throws at them, the women somehow remain friends. Handful often has a perceptive take on the situation: "She was trapped same as me, but she was trapped by her mind, by the minds of people around her, not by the law. I tried to tell her that. I said, 'my body might be a slave, but not my mind. For you, it's the other way round.'" and "This ain't the same Sarah who left here. She had a firm look in her eye and her voice didn't dither and hesitate like it used to. She'd been boiled down to a good, strong broth." Kidd treats the reader to some marvellously descriptive prose: "Mother's letter in response arrived in September. Her small, tight scrawl was thick with fury and ink." and "It was the time of year when migrating crows wheeled across the sky, thunderous flocks that moved like a single veil, and I heard them, out there in the wild chirruping air. Turning to the window, I watched the birds fill the sky before disappearing, and when the air was still again, I watched the empty place where they had been" are just two examples. A powerful and moving novel.