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    Intermodernism: Literary Culture in Mid-twentieth-century Britain (Paperback) Edited by Kristin Bluemel

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    DescriptionThese 10 original critical essays examine the fascinating writing of the Depression and World War II. Divided into four sections -Work, Community,War, and Documents - the volume focuses on texts that are typically ignored in accounts of modernism or The Auden Generation. Chapters examine writing by Elizabeth Bowen, Storm Jameson, William Empson, George Orwell, J. B. Priestley, Harold Heslop, T. H. White, Sylvia Townsend Warner, Rebecca West, John Grierson, Margery Allingham and Stella Gibbons. These authors were politically radical, or radically 'eccentric', and tended to be committed to working- and middle-class cultures, non-canonical genres, such as crime and fantasy, and minority forms of narrative, such as journalism, manifestos, film, and travel narratives, as well as novels. The volume supports further research with an appendix, 'Who Were the Intermodernists?', a listing of archival sources and an extensive bibliography.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Intermodernism

    Title
    Intermodernism
    Subtitle
    Literary Culture in Mid-twentieth-century Britain
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by Kristin Bluemel
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 264
    Width: 156 mm
    Height: 234 mm
    Thickness: 16 mm
    Weight: 422 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780748642854
    ISBN 10: 0748642854
    Classifications

    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T3.7
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC language qualifier (language as subject) V2: 2AB
    BIC E4L: LIT
    BIC subject category V2: DSBH
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET030
    Ingram Theme: CULT/BRITIS
    LC classification: PR
    DC22: 828.91209
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    Libri: I-LC
    BISAC V2.8: HIS015000, LIT004120
    Ingram Theme: CULT/ASIAN
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15740
    B&T General Subject: 495
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    BISAC V2.8: LIT008000
    Abridged Dewey: 820
    DC22: 820.900914
    BISAC V2.8: LIT004130
    Thema V1.0: NHD, DSBH
    Thema time period qualifier V1.0: 3MP
    Thema language qualifier V1.0: 2ACB
    Edition statement
    Reprint
    Publisher
    EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Imprint name
    EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Publication date
    01 June 2011
    Publication City/Country
    Edinburgh
    Author Information
    Kristin Bluemel is Professor of English at Monmouth University in New Jersey. She is author of George Orwell and the Radical Eccentrics: Intermodernism in Literary London (2004) and Experimenting on the Borders of Modernism: Dorothy Richardson's Pilgrimage (1997). She edits the interdisciplinary journal The Space Between: Literature and Culture 1914-1945 and is one of the founding members of the journal's sponsoring body, The Space Between Society.
    Review quote
    This collection offers more than a series of case studies illustrating what Bluemel (Monmouth Univ.) calls "intermodernism." It creates a new paradigm for the study of 20th-century literature and culture. Building on her own George Orwell and the Radical Eccentrics (CH, Sep'05, 43-0148), the editor brings together major scholars of 1930s-40s Britain under the rubric of intermodernism, defined in her compelling introductory essay as an aesthetic, institutional, and ideological category meant to delineate the space between modernism and postmodernism and to serve as a critical tool ! The extensive bibliography and appendix ("Who Are the Intermodernists?") will facilitate further research, especially by including the locations of archival material ! Highly recommended. -- J. M. Utell, Widener University Choice 'The recovery work of Intermodernism's contributors makes the case that adding another prefix to modernism will help clarify twentieth-century cultural studies and add new voices to humanities classrooms and scholarship.' -- Pennsylvania Literary Journal Intermodernism is an attractive book in its own right, full of thoughtful and often surprising readings of particular texts, writers, and movements. It is also a welcome and substantial contribution to the ongoing rediscovery of mid-twentieth century British writing: that "fascinating, compelling and grossly neglected" body of work, as Kristin Bluemel sums it up in her opening paragraph. -- Marina MacKay, Washington University in St. Louis Journal of British Studies This collection offers more than a series of case studies illustrating what Bluemel (Monmouth Univ.) calls "intermodernism." It creates a new paradigm for the study of 20th-century literature and culture. Building on her own George Orwell and the Radical Eccentrics (CH, Sep'05, 43-0148), the editor brings together major scholars of 1930s-40s Britain under the rubric of intermodernism, defined in her compelling introductory essay as an aesthetic, institutional, and ideological category meant to delineate the space between modernism and postmodernism and to serve as a critical tool ! The extensive bibliography and appendix ("Who Are the Intermodernists?") will facilitate further research, especially by including the locations of archival material ! Highly recommended. 'The recovery work of Intermodernism's contributors makes the case that adding another prefix to modernism will help clarify twentieth-century cultural studies and add new voices to humanities classrooms and scholarship.' Intermodernism is an attractive book in its own right, full of thoughtful and often surprising readings of particular texts, writers, and movements. It is also a welcome and substantial contribution to the ongoing rediscovery of mid-twentieth century British writing: that "fascinating, compelling and grossly neglected" body of work, as Kristin Bluemel sums it up in her opening paragraph.
    Table of contents
    Acknowledgements; Introduction: What is Intermodernism?, Kristin Bluemel; Part I: Work; 1. A Cassandra with Clout: Storm Jameson, Little Englander and Good European, Elizabeth Maslen; 2. Englands Ancient and Modern: Sylvia Townsend Warner, T. H. White and the Fictions of Medieval Englishness, Janet Montefiore; 3. 'A Strange Field': Region and Class in the Novels of Harold Heslop, John Fordham; Part II: Community; 4. Stella Gibbons, Ex-Centricity and the Suburb, Faye Hammill; 5. Intermodern Travel: J. B. Priestley's English and American Journeys, Lisa Colletta; Part III: War; 6. Under Suspicion: The Plotting of Britain in World War II Detective Spy Fiction, Phyllis Lassner; 7. Trials and Errors: The Heat of the Day and Postwar Culpability, Allan Hepburn; 8. Rebecca West's Palimpsestic Praxis: Crafting the Intermodern Voice of Witness, Debra Rae Cohen; Part IV: Documents; 9. The Intermodern Assumption of the Future: William Empson, Charles Madge and Mass-Observation, Nick Hubble; 10. 'The creative treatment of actuality': John Grierson, Documentary Cinema and 'Fact' in the 1930s, Laura Marcus; Appendix: Who Are the Intermodernists?; Select Bibliography; Notes on Contributors; Index.