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    The Interestings (Riverhead) (Paperback) By (author) Meg Wolitzer

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    Description"Remarkable . . . With this book [Wolitzer] has surpassed herself."--"The New York Times Book Review" "A victory . . . "The Interestings "secures Wolitzer's place among the best novelists of her generation. . . . She's every bit as literary as Franzen or Eugenides. But the very human moments in her work hit you harder than the big ideas. This isn't women's fiction. It's everyone's."--"Entertainment Weekly "(A) The "New York Times"-bestselling novel by Meg Wolitzer that has been called "genius" ("The Chicago Tribune"), "wonderful" ("Vanity Fair"), "ambitious" ("San Francisco Chronicle"), and a "page-turner" ("Cosmopolitan"), which "The New York Times Book Review "says is "among the ranks of books like Jonathan Franzen's "Freedom" and Jeffrey Eugenides "The Marriage Plot."" The summer that Nixon resigns, six teenagers at a summer camp for the arts become inseparable. Decades later the bond remains powerful, but so much else has changed. In "The Interestings," Wolitzer follows these characters from the height of youth through middle age, as their talents, fortunes, and degrees of satisfaction diverge. The kind of creativity that is rewarded at age fifteen is not always enough to propel someone through life at age thirty; not everyone can sustain, in adulthood, what seemed so special in adolescence. Jules Jacobson, an aspiring comic actress, eventually resigns herself to a more practical occupation and lifestyle. Her friend Jonah, a gifted musician, stops playing the guitar and becomes an engineer. But Ethan and Ash, Jules's now-married best friends, become shockingly successful--true to their initial artistic dreams, with the wealth and access that allow those dreams to keep expanding. The friendships endure and even prosper, but also underscore the differences in their fates, in what their talents have become and the shapes their lives have taken. Wide in scope, ambitious, and populated by complex characters who come together and apart in a changing New York City, "The Interestings" explores the meaning of talent; the nature of envy; the roles of class, art, money, and power; and how all of it can shift and tilt precipitously over the course of a friendship and a life.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Interestings

    Title
    The Interestings
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Meg Wolitzer
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 538
    Width: 130 mm
    Height: 198 mm
    Thickness: 36 mm
    Weight: 454 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781594632341
    ISBN 10: 1594632340
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: GEN
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.1
    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    DC21: 813.54
    BIC subject category V2: FA
    B&T General Subject: 360
    B&T Book Type: FI
    DC22: FIC
    Libri: ENGM1010
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 05
    Ingram Theme: TOPC/FAMILY
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: AMER3710
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: TP090
    Ingram Theme: SEXL/FEMINE
    Ingram Subject Code: FC
    DC22: 813/.54
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: FIC045000, FIC044000
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 34
    B&T Approval Code: P26100000
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: FIC008000, FIC019000
    LC classification: PS3573.O564 I58 2014
    Thema V1.0: FBA
    Edition statement
    Reprint
    Publisher
    Riverhead Books
    Imprint name
    Riverhead Books
    Publication date
    25 March 2014
    Author Information
    Meg Wolitzer's previous novels include "The Wife," "The Position," "The Ten-Year Nap," and "The Uncoupling." She lives in New York City.
    Review quote
    "Remarkable . . . ["The Interestings"'s] inclusive vision and generous sweep place it among the ranks of books like Jonathan Franzen's "Freedom" and Jeffrey Eugenides "The Marriage Plot." "The Interestings" is warm, all-American, and acutely perceptive about the feelings and motivations of its characters, male and female, young and old, gay and straight; but it's also stealthily, unassumingly, and undeniably a novel of ideas. . . . With this book [Wolitzer] has surpassed herself."--"The New York Times Book Review" "A victory . . . "The Interestings "secures Wolitzer's place among the best novelists of her generation. . . . She's every bit as literary as Franzen or Eugenides. But the very human moments in her work hit you harder than the big ideas. This isn't women's fiction. It's everyone's."--"Entertainment Weekly "(A) "The big questions asked by "The Interestings" are about what happened to the world (when, Jules wonders, did 'analyst' stop denoting Freud and start referring to finance?) and what happened to all that budding teenage talent. Might every privileged schoolchild have a bright future in dance or theater or glass blowing? Ms. Wolitzer hasn't got the answers, but she does have her characters mannerisms and attitudes down cold."--"The New York Times" "I don't want to insult Meg Wolitzer by calling her sprawling, engrossing new novel, "The Interestings," her most ambitious, because throughout her 30-year career of turning out well-observed, often very funny books at a steady pace, I have no doubt she has always been ambitious. . . . But "The Interestings" is exactly the kind of book that literary sorts who talk about ambitious works . . . are talking about. . . . Wolitzer is almost crushingly insightful; she doesn't just mine the contemporary mind, she seems to invade it."--"San Francisco Chronicle" "A sprawling, marvelously inventive novel . . . ambitious and enormously entertaining."--"The Washington Post" "A supre