• Instructions for a Heatwave See large image

    Instructions for a Heatwave (Paperback) By (author) Maggie O'Farrell

    04

    $10.11 - Save $2.75 21% off - RRP $12.86 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 3 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    Also available in...
    Hardback $25.08

    DescriptionA story of a dysfunctional but deeply loveable family reunited, INSTRUCTIONS FOR A HEATWAVE already feels like a contemporary classic. It was shortlisted for the 2013 Costa Novel Award. It's July 1976. In London, it hasn't rained for months, gardens are filled with aphids, water comes from a standpipe, and Robert Riordan tells his wife Gretta that he's going round the corner to buy a newspaper. He doesn't come back. The search for Robert brings Gretta's children - two estranged sisters and a brother on the brink of divorce - back home, each with different ideas as to where their father might have gone. None of them suspects that their mother might have an explanation that even now she cannot share.


Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
Showing 1 to 3 of 3 results

Reviews for Instructions for a Heatwave

Write a review
  • Top review

    A great family story5

    Librarian Lavender When Robert Riordan disappears all of Gretta's children come home. Michael Francis, Monica and Aoife all have their own problems and Monica and Aoife have issues with each other. Gretta never says directly what she means and it takes her children a long time to figure out what she knows.
    I loved this family, mostly because of their quirks. All of them have secrets and they have to come to terms with them. I couldn't wait to find out what would happen next, if something would come out, if things were going to be all right, etc. I felt like I was part of the story. Gretta and Robert are Irish and that's something that plays an important role in the book. They live in England and their children have been raised with as much of the Irish culture as possible. Gretta wants them to hang on to that, but that doesn't really happen. Everyone is disappointed with something and they are all fighting to accept themselves and one another. The story is so well written and I couldn't get enough of it. The ending was absolutely perfect as well. by Librarian Lavender

  • a brilliant read5

    Marianne Vincent Instructions For A Heatwave is the sixth novel by British author, Maggie O'Farrell. On a July Thursday at the height of Britain's 1976 heatwave, Robert Riordan goes out as usual for the morning paper but doesn't return. When no trace of him can be found, his wife, Gretta calls her daughter in Gloucester, Monica, who is having a drama of her own. Eventually, Gretta's son, Michael Francis manages to contact his younger sister, Aoife in New York, and the siblings come together at their family home to decide what is to be done. It is a gathering filled with tensions, as Aoife and Monica have been estranged for years. Not only that, but undercurrents flow as each character is dealing with shameful secrets of their own. While this could make for heavy going, the dialogue between the characters, the family dynamics and some moments of delicious irony provide a comic relief that lifts the story. As O'Farrell skilfully builds her story, the various mysteries, some from more than thirty years ago, unfold over four days. Abortion, dyslexia, divorce, betrayal, adultery, draft dodging, a dead cat, an Irish convent and a deep abiding love all feature. O'Farrell's characters are interesting and complex; they are larger than life and so very real. Her prose is a joy to experience: the feel of the heatwave is expertly conveyed and the descriptions are wonderfully evocative. "And then, it seemed to Monica, the baby opened her mouth and started to scream and that she did not stop screaming for a long time. - She screamed if laid flat, even for a moment.her legs - would work up and down, as if she was a toy with a winding mechanism, her face would crumple in on itself and the room would fill with jagged sounds that could have cut you, if you'd stood too close." and "She cannot read. She cannot do that thing that other people find so artlessly easy: to see arrangements of inked shapes on a page and alchemise them into meaning." are just two examples. A brilliant read. by Marianne Vincent

  • Seinfeld3

    Tania Hyde This is almost a book about nothing but still pretty good. I read it in 2 sittings. You've got to love it when a hypocrite gets his/her (I don't want to spoil anything) comeuppance! Don't forget your hankie! (and no, it's not sad) by Tania Hyde

Write a review
Showing 1 to 3 of 3 results