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    Inequality RE-Examined (Hardback) By (author) Amartya K. Sen

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    DescriptionIn this deft analysis, Amartya Sen argues that the dictum "all men are created equal" serves largely to deflect attention from the fact that we differ in age, gender, talents, physical abilities as well as in material advantages and social background. He argues for concentrating on higher and more basic values: individual capabilities and freedom to achieve objectives.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Inequality RE-Examined

    Title
    Inequality RE-Examined
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Amartya K. Sen
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 224
    Width: 140 mm
    Height: 210 mm
    Thickness: 15 mm
    Weight: 249 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780674452565
    ISBN 10: 0674452569
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27780
    BIC E4L: POL
    B&T Book Type: NF
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T7.0
    Ingram Subject Code: LE
    Libri: I-LE
    BIC subject category V2: JPVH
    B&T General Subject: 650
    BISAC V2.8: POL019000
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 02
    DC22: 320.011
    BISAC V2.8: POL010000
    DC21: 320.011
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    BISAC V2.8: LAW000000
    B&T Approval Code: A45307000
    Thema V1.0: JPVH
    Edition statement
    Reprint
    Publisher
    HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Imprint name
    HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Publication date
    15 March 1995
    Publication City/Country
    Cambridge, Mass
    Review quote
    Amartya Sen, [the 1998] Nobel Prizewinner in Economics, has helped give voice to the world's poor. And that is no small matter, for the very lives of the world's poor may depend on having their voices heard. In a lifetime of careful scholarship, Sen has repeatedly returned to a basic theme: even impoverished societies can improve the well-being of their least advantaged members. Societies that attend to the poorest of the poor can save their lives, promote their longevity and increase their opportunities through education and productive work. Societies that neglect the poor, on the other hand, may inadvertently allow millions to die of famine--even in the middle of an economic boom, as occurred during the great famine in Bengal, India, in 1943, the subject of Sen's most famous case study...Sen [delivers a] powerful message: annual income growth is not enough to achieve development. Societies must pay attention to social goals as well, always leaning toward their most vulnerable citizens, and overcoming deep-rooted biases to invest in the health and well-being of girls as well as boys. In a world in which 1.5 billion people subsist on less than $1 a day, this Nobel Prize can be not just a celebration of a wonderful scholar but also a clarion call to attend to the urgent needs and hopes of the world's poor.--Jeffrey Sachs "Time "