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A novel, divided into seven parts and exploring immortality. His previous works include 'The Joke', 'The Book of Laughter and Forgetting' and 'The Unbearable Lightness of Being'.

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Product details

  • Paperback | 400 pages
  • 124 x 196 x 30mm | 258.55g
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Main
  • 057114456X
  • 9780571144563
  • 22,436

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"Ingenious witty provocative and formidably intelligent, both a pleasure and a challenge to the reader." -- Jonathan Yardley, "Washington Post Book World""Inspired Kundera's most brilliantly imagined novel...A book that entrances, beguiles and charms us from first page to last."-- Susan Miron, "Cleveland Plain Dealer""Brilliantly mordant...beautifully translated...strong and mesmerizing." -- "New York Times"

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About Milan Kundera

The French-Czech novelist Milan Kundera was born in the Czech Republic and has lived in France since 1975. He is the author of the internationally acclaimed and bestselling novels The Joke, Life is Elsewhere, The Farewell Waltz, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Immortality, and the short-story collection Laughable Loves -- all originally in Czech. His more recent novels , Slowness, Identity, and Ignorance, as well as his nonfiction works, The Art of the Novel, Testaments Betrayed, The Curtain, and Encounter, were originally written in French.

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Customer reviews

"Milan Kundera is a very good writer and I find his stories interesting and easy to read. In this book he alternates between the characters and himself, drawing them together as the novel progresses. Unlike in 'The book of laughter and forgetting' where the division is apparent, here it blends and seperates repeatedly. I found this very boring to read, and quite self-indulgent on the author's part. His earlier book 'The Joke' was an excellent, character-driven novel but I'm beginning to think that was just a once-off."show more
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