• Imagining Canada: A Century of Photographs Preserved by the New York Times

    Imagining Canada: A Century of Photographs Preserved by the New York Times (Hardback) Edited by William Morassutti

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    DescriptionSophisticated and well-curated, this photographic tour through Canada's history documents the nation's evolution over more than a century, as seen through the lens of photographers from "The New York Times." The book compiles more than 100 iconic, momentous and inspiring images of Canada and includes ten commentary pieces from a range of important thinkers, historians and writers, including National Chief Shawn Atleo, MP Justin Trudeau, historians Charlotte Gray, Peter C. Newman and Tim Cook, and sports columnist Stephen Brunt. Through these pages and images, which represent a portal in time, a portrait of Canada emerges, not as seen by its own citizens, but as viewed through a distinctly American lens. The book includes photos arranged according to the following themes: - The Battlefield: Canada at War - Aboriginal People - The Changing Face of Canadian Society--Our Immigration Story - Landscape - The Political Arena - Industry - The War Machine: How the Homefront Supplied the Wars - Hockey - Icons (Stars, Sports Heroes, Political Figures, Royalty)


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  • Full bibliographic data for Imagining Canada

    Title
    Imagining Canada
    Subtitle
    A Century of Photographs Preserved by the New York Times
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by William Morassutti
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 197
    Width: 198 mm
    Height: 249 mm
    Thickness: 30 mm
    Weight: 1,139 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780385677097
    ISBN 10: 038567709X
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: PHO
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T1.4
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1KBC
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: HBJK
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 02
    BIC subject category V2: AJ
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 02
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15870
    B&T Modifier: Text Format: 03
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET034
    Ingram Theme: CULT/CANADN
    B&T General Subject: 625
    Ingram Subject Code: AP
    Libri: I-AP
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: PHO000000, HIS029000, HIS006000
    DC21: 971.00222
    BISAC V2.8: PHO023100
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 971.00222
    LC subject heading:
    DC22: 971.0022/2
    LC classification: F1026 .I46 2012
    Illustrations note
    black & white halftones
    Publisher
    Doubleday Canada
    Imprint name
    Doubleday Canada
    Publication date
    30 October 2012
    Author Information
    Ten authors contribute commentary to the book, including National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations Shawn Atleo, Member of Parliament (and son of Pierre) Justin Trudeau, historians Charlotte Gray and Tim Cook, sports columnist Stephen Brunt, John Fraser, among others.
    Review quote
    "A recently-released book of rare and historic photographs of and about Canada - called "Imagining Canada" - is a captivating look at how the camera captured images that made up the Canadian character. . . . Each [photograph] gives a fascinating, intimate glimpse of the many pieces of the puzzle that make up the Canadian mosaic." --"The West End Times " "This one's a keeper. Dozens of evocative photographs of Canada, acquired by the "NYT" over the years, accompanied by thoughtful essays by fine writers. . . . The photos capture Canada's past in a way no history book can. Some you may recognize; most you'll wonder why you haven't seen them before." --"The Toronto Star"