If Tomorrow Comes

If Tomorrow Comes

Paperback

By (author) Sidney Sheldon

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  • Publisher: Harper
  • Format: Paperback | 592 pages
  • Dimensions: 106mm x 174mm x 36mm | 259g
  • Publication date: 3 January 1998
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0006479677
  • ISBN 13: 9780006479673
  • Sales rank: 116,120

Product description

The international bestseller from the master of suspense. A mafia conspiracy and one women against the world. Tracy Whitey is on top of the world. Young, beautiful, intelligent, she is about to marry into wealth and glamour - until, betrayed by her own innocence, she finds herself in prison, framed by a ruthless mafia gang and abandoned by the man she loves. Beaten and broken, but surviving with her dazzling ingenuity, Tracy emerges from her savage ordeal - determined to avenge those who have destroyed her life. Her thirst for revenge takes her from New Orleans to London, from Paris to Madrid and Amsterdam. Tracy is playing for the highest stakes in a deadly game. Only one man can challenge her - he's handsome, persuasive and every bit as daring. Only one man can stop her - an evil genius whose only hope of salvation is in Tracy's destruction...

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Author information

Sidney Sheldon is the mega-selling international author of seventeen previous bestselling novels. He features in the Guinness Book of Records as the world's most translated author. He is also a highly acclaimed, award-winning scriptwriter for stage, film and television.

Review quote

'A master storyteller at the top of his game.' USA Today 'Compulsively readable.' New York Times Book Review 'Sidney Sheldon is a master of giving the public what it wants' Los Angeles Times

Editorial reviews

Cardboard heroine Tracy Whitney goes from sweet-young-thing to framed prisoninmate, from ruthless avenger to international jewel-thief - as Sheldon, never known for originality, does his laziest recycling yet, stringing together old movie-plot cliches without shape or conviction. The opening chapters are almost comic in their fast-food melodrama: pregnant Tracy, a Philadelphia bank-employee about to wed society scion Charles Stanhope III, hurries to hometown New Orleans after learning of her bankrupt mother's suicide; she confronts the mobster who ruined Mother, accidentally shooting him; but the Mob frames her for assault and robbery, landing Tracy in the Big House - where she miscarries after violent lesbian rape. Will Tracy have to serve 15 years? No, of course not: after saving the Warden's wee daughter from drowning, Tracy gets a pardon. So now she's free to take tricky revenge on the half-dozen creeps who framed her - in a series of unconvincing, quickie vignettes. (Charles III, who dumped Tracy in her hour of need, requires no revenge action: he's now miserably married to a society type.) End of story? Hardly. Unable to get work because of her prison past, Tracy reluctantly becomes a super-thief and con artist: she pulls off one daring scam after another (a jewel-switch in London, an art theft in Madrid, etc.); she is pursued by an ugly, obsessed insurance-company sleuth (a misogynistic psycho who killed his sluttish mother); and she keeps running into infuriating rival-thief Jeff Stevens. . . who'll eventually become her lover and soulmate. A couple of the heists here are pleasantly clever; most, however, are tired and/or farfetched. At every turn, moreover, Sheldon's episodic, play-doh plotting is riddled with implausibilities, painful contrivances. (E.g., super-crook Tracy accidentally leaves a scarf with her initials on it at the scene of one crime.) And, above all, Tracy remains a faceless, unengaging creature throughout - mechanically switching from idiotic wimp to cool customer. Without the zest and corny satisfactions of Master of the Game, Rage of Angels, or Bloodline: Sheldon's weakest novel yet, especially for movie-wise readers (who'll suffer continuous dejavu) - but sure to attract the large Sheldon following. (Kirkus Reviews)