A Hundred and One Days
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A Hundred and One Days : A Baghdad Journal

  • Paperback
By (author) Asne Seierstad

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In January 2003 Asne Seierstad entered Baghdad on a ten-day visa. She was to stay for over three months, reporting on the war and its aftermath. A Hundred and One Days is her compelling account of a city under siege, and a fascinating insight into the life of a foreign correspondent. An award-winning writer, Seierstad brilliantly details the frustrations and dangers journalists faced trying to uncover the truth behind the all-pervasive propaganda. She also offers a unique portrait of Baghdad and its people, trying to go about their daily business under the constant threat of attack. Seierstad's passionate and erudite book conveys both the drama and the tragedy of her one hundred and one days in a city at war.

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  • Paperback | 336 pages
  • 124 x 188 x 24mm | 281.23g
  • 02 Dec 2004
  • Little, Brown Book Group
  • Virago Press Ltd
  • London
  • 2 maps
  • 1844081400
  • 9781844081400
  • 165,151

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Author Information

Asne Seierstad (born 1970) has worked as a correspondent in Russia, China, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq, amongst many other places. She has received numerous awards for her journalism. She lives in Oslo.

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Review quote

A story you won't be able to put down. BOOKSELLER

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Review text

Asne Seierstad, an experienced Norwegian foreign correspondent, is best known for the international best-seller, The Bookseller of Kabul, a portrait of life in Afghanistan. Seierstad's latest offering is an account of her stay in Baghdad during the spring of 2003, where she reported on the war in Iraq. The journal gives an effective insight into the obstacles facing a foreign correspondent trying to report what is really going on and what people's genuine reactions are in a totalitarian state. She captures her frustration best when she describes how she feels encapsulated in a bubble, never able to really get close to the lives of the Iraqis. This results in a sense of distance which makes her account of life in Baghdad before, during, and after the war strangely detached. (Kirkus UK)

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