How to Do Things with Videogames

How to Do Things with Videogames

Paperback Electronic Mediations (Paperback)

By (author) Ian Bogost

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  • Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
  • Format: Paperback | 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 140mm x 213mm x 15mm | 272g
  • Publication date: 30 August 2011
  • Publication City/Country: Minnesota
  • ISBN 10: 081667647X
  • ISBN 13: 9780816676477
  • Edition statement: New.
  • Sales rank: 87,553

Product description

In recent years, computer games have moved from the margins of popular culture to its center. Reviews of new games and profiles of game designers now regularly appear in the New York Times and the New Yorker, and sales figures for games are reported alongside those of books, music, and movies. They are increasingly used for purposes other than entertainment, yet debates about videogames still fork along one of two paths: accusations of debasement through violence and isolation or defensive paeans to their potential as serious cultural works. In How to Do Things with Videogames, Ian Bogost contends that such generalizations obscure the limitless possibilities offered by the medium's ability to create complex simulated realities.

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Author information

Ian Bogost is professor of digital media at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His books include "Persuasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames "and" Newsgames: Journalism at Play."

Review quote

"What can you do with videogames? Play pranks, meditate on politics, achieve zen-like zone-outs, turn the act of travel back into adventure, and describe how to safely exit a plane--among other things, as Ian Bogost explains in this superb, philosophical, and wide-ranging book on the expressive qualities of games."--Clive Thompson, columnist for "Wired" and contributing writer for the "New York Times Magazine"