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    Honor Thy Gods: Popular Religion in Greek Tragedy (Paperback) By (author) Jon D. Mikalson

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    DescriptionIn "Honor Thy Gods" Jon Mikalson uses the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides to explore popular religious beliefs and practices of Athenians in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. and examines how these playwrights portrayed, manipulated, and otherwise represented popular religion in their plays. He discusses the central role of honor in ancient Athenian piety and shows that the values of popular piety are not only reflected but also reaffirmed in tragedies. Mikalson begins by examining what tragic characters and choruses have to say about the nature of the gods and their intervention in human affairs. Then, by tracing the fortunes of diverse characters -- among them Creon and Antigone, Ajax and Odysseus, Hippolytus, Pentheus, and even Athens and Troy -- he shows that in tragedy those who violate or challenge contemporary popular religious beliefs suffer, while those who support these beliefs are rewarded. The beliefs considered in Mikalson's analysis include Athenians' views on matters regarding asylum, the roles of guests and hosts, oaths, the various forms of divination, health and healing, sacrifice, pollution, the religious responsibilities of parents, children, and citizens, homicide, the dead, and the afterlife. After summarizing the vairous forms of piety and impiety related to these beliefs found in the tragedies, Mikalson isolates "honoring the gods" as the fundamental concept of Greek piety. He concludes by describing the different relationships of the three tragedians to the religion of their time and their audience, arguing that the tragedies of Euripides most consistently support the values of popular religion.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Honor Thy Gods

    Title
    Honor Thy Gods
    Subtitle
    Popular Religion in Greek Tragedy
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Jon D. Mikalson
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 376
    Width: 154 mm
    Height: 233 mm
    Thickness: 25 mm
    Weight: 576 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780807843482
    ISBN 10: 0807843482
    Classifications

    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T3.7
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC E4L: LIT
    BIC subject category V2: DSG
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    BIC subject category V2: HRKP, DSBB
    BIC language qualifier (language as subject) V2: 2AHA
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    Libri: I-LC
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25720
    B&T General Subject: 495
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    DC21: 882.0109
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: LIT004190
    B&T Approval Code: A24204000
    BISAC V2.8: LIT013000
    LC subject heading: ,
    DC22: 882.0109
    LC subject heading: , ,
    LC classification: PA3136 .M54 1991, A3136.M54
    Thema V1.0: DSG, DSBB, QRS
    Edition statement
    New ed.
    Illustrations note
    black & white illustrations
    Publisher
    The University of North Carolina Press
    Imprint name
    The University of North Carolina Press
    Publication date
    20 January 1992
    Publication City/Country
    Chapel Hill
    Review quote
    It should quickly establish itself as required reading for students of both Greek religion and Greek tragedy.Robert S. J. Garland, Colgate University
    Back cover copy
    In Honor Thy Gods Jon Mikalson uses the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides to explore popular religious beliefs and practices of Athenians in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. and examines how these playwrights portrayed, manipulated, and otherwise represented popular religion in their plays. The author discusses the central role of honor in ancient Athenian piety and shows that the values of popular piety are not only reflected but also reaffirmed in tragedies.