Homing Devices

Homing Devices : The Poor as Objects of Public Policy and Practice

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Homing Devices is a collection of ethnographies that address the central problem affecting not only the United States but also other developed and developing nations around the globe-affordable housing. These ethnographies cut across national and cultural borders, offering a diverse look at housing policies and practices as well as addressing the problems associated with providing or obtaining affordable housing.

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  • Paperback | 248 pages
  • 147.3 x 226.1 x 15.2mm | 340.2g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MDUnited States
  • English
  • Illustrations, map
  • 0739114603
  • 9780739114605

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This book is a useful toolkit for anyone concerned about the human right to housing, the current war on the poor, and organizing/empowering low income people. Readers will gain new insights into action strategies at the local level. -- Michael Stoops, National Coalition for the Homeless An excellent synthesis of detailed ethnographic research and social critique of current housing policy in the U.S. and globally... Demonstrates how an ethnographic understanding of the lives of those who live in public housing can generate (produce) better and more equitable policy decisions. -- Setha Low, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

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About Marilyn M. Thomas-Houston

marilyn m. thomas-houston is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and African American Studies and former Interim Director of the African American Studies Program at the University of Florida. Mark Schuller was formerly the organizer for the St. Paul Tenants Union. He is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in the Anthropology Department at University of California, Santa Barbara.

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