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By (author) Toni Morrison

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  • Publisher: Random House Inc
  • Format: Hardback | 145 pages
  • Dimensions: 145mm x 211mm x 23mm | 318g
  • Publication date: 8 May 2012
  • Publication City/Country: New York
  • ISBN 10: 0307594165
  • ISBN 13: 9780307594167
  • Sales rank: 121,057

Product description

America's most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man's desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war. Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he's hated all his life. As Frank revisits his memories from childhood and the war that have left him questioning his sense of self, he discovers a profound courage he had thought he could never possess again. A deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood--and his home.

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Author information

Toni Morrison is the author of ten novels, from "The Bluest Eye" (1970) to "A Mercy" (2008). She has received the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In 1993 she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. She lives in New York.

Review quote

"Short, swift, and luminescent . . . The music of Morrison's language, with its poetic oral qualities, its ability to be both past and present in one long line, requires a robust structure, a big space; a small auditorium simply does not suit it. "Home," then, is . . . a remarkable thing: proof that Morrison is at once America's most deliberate and flexible writer. She has almost entirely retooled her style to tell a story that demands speed, brevity, the threat of a looming curtain call." --John Freeman, "The Boston Globe" "Part of Morrison's longstanding greatness resides in her ability to animate specific stories about the black experience and simultaneously speak to all experience. It's precisely by committing unreservedly to the first that she's able to transcend the circumscribed audience it might imply. This work's accomplishment lies in its considerable capacity to make us feel that we are each not only resident but co-owner of, and collectively accountable for, this land we call home." --Leah Hager Cohen, "The New York Times Book Review" "Powerful . . . "Home," the latest novel by Toni Morrison, is almost eerie in its timeliness. Set in the 1950s, it does not evoke the martini and pinched waist nostalgia of "Mad Men." Rather, it calls to mind the plight of today's veterans returning from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. . . . A hallmark of Morrison's magic is the way that her imagination engages critically with several subjects simultaneously, but "Home" is particularly intriguing because it also seems to be a reflection on the author's previous works. . . . . The writing reads like a love letter to a generation that took the English language, lubricated its syntax and bent meanings as the situation required. . . . The result is not poetry, exactly, yet the characters communicate in such a way that there are subtle metaphors in every exchange. The events of this narrative are striking and arresting in the manner that one expects from Morris