• A History of the Byzantine State and Society See large image

    A History of the Byzantine State and Society (Paperback) By (author) Warren T. Treadgold

    $37.26 - Save $11.01 22% off - RRP $48.27 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 3 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    DescriptionThis is the first comprehensive and up-to-date history of Byzantium to appear in almost sixty years, and the first ever to cover both the Byzantine state and Byzantine society. It begins in A.D. 285, when the emperor Diocletian separated what became Byzantium from the western Roman Empire, and ends in 1461, when the last Byzantine outposts fell to the Ottoman Turks. Spanning twelve centuries and three continents, the Byzantine Empire linked the ancient and modern worlds, shaping and transmitting Greek, Roman, and Christian traditions - including the Greek classics, Roman law, and Christian theology - that remain vigorous today, not only in Eastern Europe and the Middle East but throughout Western civilization. Though in its politics Byzantium often resembled a third-world dictatorship, it has never yet been matched in maintaining a single state for so long, over a wide area inhabited by heterogeneous peoples. Drawing on a wealth of original sources and modern works, the author treats political and social developments as a single vivid story, told partly in detailed narrative and partly in essays that clarify long-term changes. He avoids stereotypes and rejects such old and new historical orthodoxies as the persistent weakness of the Byzantine economy and the pervasive importance of holy men in Late Antiquity. Without neglecting underlying social, cultural, and economic trends, the author shows the often crucial impact of nearly a hundred Byzantine emperors and empresses. What the emperor or empress did, or did not do, could rapidly confront ordinary Byzantines with economic ruin, new religious doctrines, or conquest by a foreign power. Much attention is paid to the complex life of the court and bureaucracy that has given us the adjective "byzantine." The major personalities include such famous names as Constantine, Justinian, Theodora, and Heraclius, along with lesser-known figures like Constans II, Irene, Basil II the Bulgar-Slayer, and Michael VIII Palaeologus. Byzantine civilization emerges as durable, creative, and realistic, overcoming repeated setbacks to remain prosperous almost to the end. With 221 illustrations and 18 maps that complement the text, A History of the Byzantine State and Society should long remain the standard history of Byzantium not just for students and scholars but for all readers.


Other books

Other people who viewed this bought | Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
  • Full bibliographic data for A History of the Byzantine State and Society

    Title
    A History of the Byzantine State and Society
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Warren T. Treadgold
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 1044
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 229 mm
    Thickness: 51 mm
    Weight: 1,383 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780804726306
    ISBN 10: 0804726302
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25540
    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.2
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD, HBLC
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 05
    Libri: I-HP
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    B&T General Subject: 431
    Ingram Theme: CULT/GREECE
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002000, HIS037020
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1QDAZ
    DC21: 949.502
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Approval Code: A14203030
    BISAC V2.8: HIS042000
    DC22: 949.502
    BIC subject category V2: 1QDAZ
    DC22: 949.5/02
    LC classification: DF552 .T65 1997, DF552.T65
    Thema V1.0: NHDJ
    Thema geographical qualifier V1.0: 1QBCB
    Edition statement
    First.
    Illustrations note
    221 half-tones 18 maps
    Publisher
    Stanford University Press
    Imprint name
    Stanford University Press
    Publication date
    25 October 1997
    Publication City/Country
    Palo Alto
    Review quote
    "A vivid story of Byzantium's existence over the span of 1,100 years... Drawing on the latest scholarship and written for both the general reader and the scholar, this work may well become the standard English-language history of Byzantium." - Library Journal "Fluently written for the general reader - few will tire of its 850 pages of text - its coherent account reflects the most up-to-date scholarship." - Los Angeles Times Book Review
    Back cover copy
    "A vivid story of Byzantium's existence over the span of 1,100 years. . . . Drawing on the latest scholarship and written for both the general reader and the scholar, this work may well become the standard English-language history of Byzantium."--Library Journal "Fluently written for the general reader--few will tire of its 850 pages of text--its coherent account reflects the most up-to-date scholarship."--Los Angeles Times Book Review
    Flap copy
    This is the first comprehensive and up-to-date history of Byzantium to appear in almost sixty years, and the first ever to cover both the Byzantine state and Byzantine society. It begins in a.d. 285, when the emperor Diocletian separated what became Byzantium from the western Roman Empire, and ends in 1461, when the last Byzantine outposts fell to the Ottoman Turks. Spanning twelve centuries and three continents, the Byzantine Empire linked the ancient and modern worlds, shaping and transmitting Greek, Roman, and Christian traditions--including the Greek classics, Roman law, and Christian theology--that remain vigorous today, not only in Eastern Europe and the Middle East but throughout Western civilization. Though in its politics Byzantium often resembled a third-world dictatorship, it has never yet been matched in maintaining a single state for so long, over a wide area inhabited by heterogeneous peoples. Drawing on a wealth of original sources and modern works, the author treats political and social developments as a single vivid story, told partly in detailed narrative and partly in essays that clarify long-term changes. He avoids stereotypes and rejects such old and new historical orthodoxies as the persistent weakness of the Byzantine economy and the pervasive importance of holy men in Late Antiquity. Without neglecting underlying social, cultural, and economic trends, the author shows the often crucial impact of nearly a hundred Byzantine emperors and empresses. What the emperor or empress did, or did not do, could rapidly confront ordinary Byzantines with economic ruin, new religious doctrines, or conquest by a foreign power. Much attention is paid to the complex life of the court and bureaucracy that has given us the adjective "byzantine." The major personalities include such famous names as Constantine, Justinian, Theodora, and Heraclius, along with lesser-known figures like Constans II, Irene, Basil II the Bulgar-Slayer, and Michael VIII Palaeologus. Byzantine civilization emerges as durable, creative, and realistic, overcoming repeated setbacks to remain prosperous almost to the end. With 221 illustrations and 18 maps that complement the text, A History of the Byzantine State and Society should long remain the standard history of Byzantium not just for students and scholars but for all readers.
    Table of contents
    Introduction; Part I. The Enlarged State and the Burdened Society: 1. The refoundation of the Empire, 284-337; 2. The state under strain, 337-395; 3. The danger of barbarization, 395-457; 4. The formation of Byzantine society, 284-457; Part II. The Interrupted Advance: 5. The eastern recovery, 457-518; 6. The reconquests and the plague, 518-565; 7. The danger of overextension, 565-610; 8. A divided society, 457-610; Part III. The Contained Catastrophe: 9. Two fights for survival, 610-668; 10. The war of attrition, 668-717; 11. The passing of the crisis, 717-780; 12. The shrinking of society, 610-780; Part IV. The Long Revival: 13. Internal reforms, 780-842; 14. External gains, 842-912; 15. The gains secured, 912-963; 16. The great conquests, 963-1025; 17. The expansion of society , 780-1025; Part V. The Weak State and the Wealthy Society: 18. Erratic government, 1025-1081; 19. Improvised reconstruction, 1081-1143; 21. A restless society, 1025-1204; Part VI. The Failed Restoration: 22. The successor states, 1204-1261; 23. The restored empire, 1261-1328; 24. The breakdown, 1328-1391; 25. The end of Byzantine independence, 1391-1461; 26. The separation of society from state, 1204-1461; Conclusion; Appendix; Abbreviations; Bibliographical survey; Endnotes; Index.