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Herzog

Herzog

Paperback Penguin Modern Classics

By (author) Saul Bellow, Introduction by Malcolm Bradbury

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  • Publisher: PENGUIN CLASSICS
  • Format: Paperback | 368 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 194mm x 20mm | 259g
  • Publication date: 1 October 2007
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0141184876
  • ISBN 13: 9780141184876
  • Sales rank: 16,308

Product description

A masterful twist on the epistolary novel, Saul Bellow's "Herzog" is part confessional, part exorcism, and a wholly unique achievement in postmodern fiction. This "Penguin Classics" edition includes an introduction by Malcolm Bradbury in "Penguin Modern Classics". Is Moses Herzog losing his mind? His formidable wife Madeleine has left him for his best friend, and Herzog is left alone with his whirling thoughts - yet he still sees himself as a survivor, raging against private disasters and the myriad catastrophes of the modern age. In a crumbling house which he shares with rats, his head buzzing with ideas, he writes frantic, unsent letters to friends and enemies, colleagues and famous people, the living and the dead, revealing the spectacular workings of his labyrinthine mind and the innermost secrets of his troubled heart. Saul Bellow (1915-2005) was a Canadian - born American writer who enjoyed a dazzling career as a novelist, marked with numerous literary prizes, including the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature. His books include "The Adventures of Augie March", "Herzog", "More Die of Heartbreak", "Mosby's Memoirs and Other Stories", "Mr. Sammler's Planet", "Seize The Day" and "The Victim". If you enjoyed "Herzog", you might like Bellow's "Seize the Day", also available in "Penguin Modern Classics". "Spectacular ...surely Bellow's greatest novel" (Malcolm Bradbury). "A masterpiece ...Herzog's voice, for all its wildness and strangeness and foolishness, is the voice of a civilization, our civilization". ("The New York Times Book Review").

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Author information

SAUL BELLOW's dazzling career as a novelist has been marked with numerous literary prizes, including the 1976 Nobel Prize, and the Gold Medal for the Novel. His other books include The Adventures of Augie March, Herzog, More Die of Heartbreak, Mosby's Memoirs and Other Stories, Mr. Sammler's Planet, Seize The Day and The Victim. Saul Bellow died in 2005. Malcolm Bradbury was a novelist, critic, television dramatist and Emeritus Professor of American Studies at the University of East Anglia. He was author of many novels, among them: The History Man (1975), which won the Royal Society of Literature Heinemann Prize and was adapted as a famous television series; Rates of Exchange (1983), which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize; The Modern British Novel (1993) and Dangerous Pilgrimages (1995). Malcolm Bradbury was awarded the CBE in 1991 and died in 2000.

Editorial reviews

There are two things we can say. Many feel Bellow is the best novelist of his generation, or at the very least, the best stylist. Herzog is not one of his best novels. It is, however, irritatingly impressive, and a very crucial work in the canon. It looks backwards and forwards. Something of Seize the Day is here- the Levantine honesty; something too of Henderson's nervy brilliance; and something quite new: the hero, an intellectual schlemihl, a professor of philosophy, a searcher trying on the masks of comedy and tragedy, seems to be an alter ego, as if Bellow were on a trial run, getting rid of the more subjective kinks for a forthcoming Major Leap. And that might explain the self-indulgence which inhabits the book, and a particular strategy-charming, funny, educative, boring- whereby Herzog is kept writing letters to the great or near-great, past and present, from Nietzsche to Ike. The plot is as cluttered as a case history: married twice, cuckolded by his best friend, romancing hither and thither, Herzog engages in numerous journeys both through his own mind and the worlds of New York, Chicago, Montreal. He contemplates murder, remembers the Jewish experience, takes the temperature of the metropolis (Bellow is of course a master at evoking alienation), meditates as an open-ended scholar, a self-conscious lover: "But what do you want, Herzog?" "But that's just it- I don't want anything." Characters dart in and out, for the most part, like the dialogue, demandingly, dexterously real; the details are splendid. In the end wry, whipped Herzog (I will do no more to enact the peculiarities of life. This is done well enough without my special assistance) has no messages for anyone. He will presumably, Just Live. Bearing an odd-shaped resemblance to the Henry of Berryman's Dream Songs, Herzog sums-up prevalent mood: a Chaplinesque acceptance of the end of ideals. It should be read. (Kirkus Reviews)