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    Heaven and Earth in Ancient Greek Cosmology (Astrophysics and Space Science Library (Hardcover)) (Hardback) By (author) Dirk Couprie

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    DescriptionIn Miletus, about 550 B.C., together with our world-picture cosmology was born. This book tells the story. In Part One the reader is introduced in the archaic world-picture of a flat earth with the cupola of the celestial vault onto which the celestial bodies are attached. One of the subjects treated in that context is the riddle of the tilted celestial axis. This part also contains an extensive chapter on archaic astronomical instruments. Part Two shows how Anaximander (610-547 B.C.) blew up this archaic world-picture and replaced it by a new one that is essentially still ours. He taught that the celestial bodies orbit at different distances and that the earth floats unsupported in space. This makes him the founding father of cosmology. Part Three discusses topics that completed the new picture described by Anaximander. Special attention is paid to the confrontation between Anaxagoras and Aristotle on the question whether the earth is flat or spherical, and on the battle between Aristotle and Heraclides Ponticus on the question whether the universe is finite or infinite.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Heaven and Earth in Ancient Greek Cosmology

    Title
    Heaven and Earth in Ancient Greek Cosmology
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Dirk Couprie
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 296
    Width: 160 mm
    Height: 234 mm
    Thickness: 23 mm
    Weight: 544 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781441981158
    ISBN 10: 1441981152
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: PHI
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S2.1
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: PDX
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    BIC subject category V2: PDA
    LC subject heading:
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 01
    B&T Modifier: Subject Development: 01
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 05
    Ingram Subject Code: SE
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/ANCIEN
    B&T Merchandise Category: SCI
    B&T General Subject: 710
    Ingram Theme: CULT/GREECE
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 16480
    BISAC V2.8: SCI034000
    B&T Modifier: Geographic Designator: 37
    BIC subject category V2: HPJ
    Abridged Dewey: 113
    DC22: 113
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002010
    BIC subject category V2: PHR
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: SCI015000
    Libri: KOSM6000, WISS6700, PHYS1033
    DC22: 113.0938
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: B67
    LC subject heading:
    LC classification: QC6.9
    LC subject heading: ,
    LC classification: BD495 .C68 2011
    LC subject heading: , ,
    LC classification: QC1-999, QC5.53, QB980-991
    Thema V1.0: QDTJ, PDX, PDA, PHR
    Edition statement
    2011.
    Illustrations note
    5 black & white tables, 1 colour tables, biography
    Publisher
    Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
    Imprint name
    Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
    Publication date
    06 April 2011
    Publication City/Country
    New York, NY
    Review quote
    From the reviews: "Independent researcher/philosopher Couprie has extended his doctoral dissertation work on Anaximander (610-547 BCE) to situate him within the context of Greek history and philosophy of astronomy. ... Excellent illustrations assist the reader in visualizing the ancient viewpoints. The plethora of detail and the subject matter make this a book most likely to be appreciated by experts rather than general readers. Summing Up: Recommended. Researchers and professionals." (M.-K. Hemenway, Choice, Vol. 49 (2), October, 2011)
    Back cover copy
    In Miletus, about 550 B.C., together with our world-picture cosmology was born. This book tells the story. In Part One the reader is introduced in the archaic world-picture of a flat earth with the cupola of the celestial vault onto whichthe celestial bodies are attached. One of the subjects treated in that context is the riddle of the tilted celestial axis. This part also contains an extensive chapter on archaic astronomical instruments.Part Twoshows how Anaximander (610-547 B.C.) blew up this archaic world-picture and replaced it by a new one that is essentially still ours. He taught that the celestial bodies orbit at different distances and that the earth floats unsupported in space. This makes him the founding father of cosmology.Part Threediscusses topics that completed the new picturedescribed by Anaximander. Special attention is paid to the confrontation between Anaxagoras and Aristotle on the question whether the earth is flat or spherical, and on the battlebetween Aristotle and Heraclides Ponticus on the question whether the universe is finite or infinite. In this book, Dirk L. Couprie presents his efforts at clarifying the views of the pioneers of theoretical cosmology. It covers the crucial period from about the middle of the sixth until the middle of the fourth century B.C., with its focus on the magnificent figure of Anaximander. The book by Dirk Couprie constitutes an important and in several respects indispensable contribution to this field. Dmitri PanchenkoSt. Petersburg State University
    Table of contents
    The Archaic World-Picture.- Archaic Astronomical Instruments.- How Thales Was Able to Predict the Solar Eclipse of 28 May 585 B.C..- The Shape of the Earth According to Thales.- The Riddle of the Celestial Axis.- The First Map of the Earth.- Anaximander, and the Discovery of Space.- Anaximander, A Survey of his Ideas.- The Discovery of Space: Anaximander's Cosmology.- Anaximander's Numbers: The Dimensions of the Universe.- The Visualization of Anaximander's World-Picture.- Bellows or Lightning? A Curious Terminology Explained.- Critique of an Alleged Cosmic Architecture.- A Survey from Anaximander to Aristarchus.- With Fear For His Own Life: Anaxagoras as a Cosmologist.- The Sun at the Horizon: Anaxagoras' Argument for a Flat Earth.- The Sun is as Big as the Peloponnesus.- The Dodecahedron, or the Shape of the Earth According to Plato.- Fear of Falling: Aristotle on the Shape of the Earth.- Heraclides Ponticus and the Infinite Universe.-