Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh

Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh

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By (author) Joyce A. Tyldesley

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  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
  • Format: Paperback | 304 pages
  • Dimensions: 128mm x 196mm x 22mm | 240g
  • Publication date: 1 July 1998
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0140244646
  • ISBN 13: 9780140244649
  • Edition statement: Revised ed.
  • Illustrations note: 16pp b&w halftones
  • Sales rank: 154,501

Product description

Queen - or, as she would prefer to be remembered King - Hatchepsut was an astonishing woman. Brilliantly defying tradition she became the female embodiment of a male role, dressing in men's clothes and even wearing a false beard. Forgotten until Egptologists deciphered hieroglyphics in the 1820's, she has since been subject to intense speculation about her actions and motivations. Combining archaeological and historical evidence from a wide range of sources, Joyce Tyldesley's dazzling piece of detection strips away the myths and misconceptions and finally restores the female pharaoh to her rightful place.

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Author information

Joyce Tyldesley lives in Bolton, Lancashire. She gained a first-class honours degree in archaeology from Liverpool University in 1981 and a doctorate from Oxford in 1986. She is now Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics andOriental Studies at Liverpool University and a freelance writer and lecturer on Egyptian archaeology. Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Egypt, is published by Penguin and her next book - a biography of Nefertiti - will be delivered in May 1997.

Table of contents

Acknowledgements Introduction 1. Backdrop: Egypt in the Early Eighteenth Dynasty 2. A Strong Family: The Tuthmosides 3. Queen of Egypt 4. King of Egypt 5. War and Peace 6. Propaganda in Stone 7. Senenmut: Greatest of the Great 8. The End and the Aftermath Notes Further Reading Index Plates 1. The Temple of Amen at Karnak. (Werner Foreman Archive) 2. The Valley of the Kings. 3. Hatchepsut as king offering before the barque of Amen. (Block from the Chapelle Rouge, Open-Air Museum, Karnak) 4. The God Amen. (Cairo Museum garden) 5. Seated statue of Hatchepsut from Djeser-Djeseru showing the king with a female body and male accessories. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund and Edward Harkness Gift, 1929 [29.3.2]) 6. The near-identical figures for King Hatchepsut and King Tuthmosis III, Hatchepsut in front. (Block from the Chapelle Rouge, Open-Air Museum, Karnak) 7. Scene showing the gods crowning King Hatchepsut, which had been attacked in antiquity. 8. Head of Hatchepsut. (Cairo Museum) 9. Granite statue of Hatchepsut. (Open-Air Museum, Karnak) 10. Red granite sphinx of Hatchepsut. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1931 [31.3.166]) 11. The standing obelisk of Hatchepsut at the heart of the Temple of Amen, Karnak. (Werner Foreman Archive) 12. a) and b) Djeser-Djeseru. 13. Senenmut and the Princess Neferure. (Cairo Museum and British Museum) 14. Senenmut and Neferure.(Cairo Museum) 15. Osiride head of Hatchepsut. (Cairo Museum) 16. The carefully erased image of Hatchepsut. (Temple of Amen, Karnak) 17. Tuthmosis III. (Luxor Museum) Figures CHAPTER 1 1.1 The cartouche of King Sekenenre Tao II 1.2 The cartouche of King Kamose 1.3 The cartouche of King Ahmose 1.4 Old and New Kingdom soldiers (after Wilkinson, J. G., 1853, The Ancient Egyptians: their life and customs, London, Figs. 297, 300) 1.5 The god Amen (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 94) 1.6 The goddess Mut (after Seton-Williams, V. and Stocks, P., 1983, Blue Guide, Egypt, London and New York, p.48) CHAPTER 2 2.1 King Ahmose and his grandmother, Queen Tetisheri (after Ayrton, E.R., Currelly, C.T. and Weigall, A.E.P, 1903, Abydos III, London, Plate LII) 2.2 The god Osiris (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 106) 2.3 The god Horus (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 108) 2.4 The cartouche of King Amenhotep I 2.5 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis I CHAPTER 3 3.1 The infant Hatchepsut being suckled by the goddess Hathor (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate LIII) 3.2 A hippopotamus hunter (after Wilkinson, J. G., 1853, The Ancient Egyptians: their life and customs, London, Fig. 253) 3.3 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis II 3.4 Tuthmosis II (after Naville, E., 1906, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 5, London, Plate CXXXV) 3.5 Plan of Hatchepsut's first tomb (after Carter, H., 1917, A Tomb prepared for Queen Hatshepsuit and other recent discoveries at Thebes, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 4, Plate 20) CHAPTER 4 4.1 The cartouche of King Maatkare Hatchepsut 4.2 The pregnant Queen Ahmose is led to the birthing bower (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate XLIX) 4.3 The infant Hatchepsut in the arms of a divine nurse (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate LIII) 4.4 Hatchepsut and Amen on a block from the Chapelle Rouge 4.5 Plan of Hatchepsut's king's tomb (after Davis, T M., ed., 1906, The Tomb of Hatshopsitu, London, Plate 8) 4.6 The goddess Isis from the sarcophagus of Hatchepsut CHAPTER 5 5.1 Hatchepsut as a man (after Naville, E., 1908, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 6, London, Plate CLVII) 5.2 Tree being transported from Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXIV) 5.3 House on stilts, Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXIX) 5.4 The obese queen of Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXIX) 5.5 Ape from Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXVI) 5.6 Tuthmosis III offers before the barque of Amen (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXXII) CHAPTER 6 6.1 Plan of the Speos Artemidos (after Fairman, H.W and Grdseloff, B., 1947, Texts of Hatshepsut and Sethos I inside Speos Artemidos, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 33, Fig. I) 6.2 Reconstruction of the Amen temple at Karnak during the reign of Hatchepsut 6.3 Plan of Djeser-Djeseru 6.4 Hatchepsut being suckled by the goddess Hathor in the form of a cow (after Davis, T.M., ed., 1906, The Tomb of Hatshopsitu, London, Plate 58) 6.5 Hathor in her anthropoid form (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 101) CHAPTER 7 7.1 The damaged figure of Senenmut from Tomb 353 (after Dorman, P.F, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plate 81) 7.2 Sketch-portrait of Senenmut from the wall of Tomb 353 7.3 Hatchepsut and Senenmut? Crude graffito from a Deir el-Bahri tomb (after Manniche, L., 1977, Some Aspects of Ancient Egyptian Sexual Life, Acta Orientalia 38, Fig. 4) 7.4 Senenrnut worshipping at Djeser-Djeseru 7.5 Plan and reconstruction of the facade of Tomb 71 (based on Dorman, P.E, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plates 4a and 4c) 7.6 Plan of Tomb 353 (after Dorman, P E, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plate 51c) CHAPTER 8 8.1 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis III 8.2 Tuthmosis III being suckled by the tree-goddess Isis (after Stevenson Smith, W., revised by W.K. Simpson, 1981, The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Haven and London, Plate 257) 8.3 Tuthmosis III and his mother Isis, boating through the Underworld (after Stevenson Smith, W., revised by W.K. Simpson, 1981, The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Haven and London, Plate 257) 8.4 The High Priestess of Amen-Re, Hatchepsut (after Budge, E.A.W, 1902, Egypt and her Asiatic Empire, London, Fig. 3) Maps Chronologies: The Tuthmoside Family Tree; Historical Events