The Gruffalo

The Gruffalo

Hardback

By (author) Julia Donaldson, Illustrated by Axel Scheffler

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  • Publisher: MACMILLAN CHILDREN'S BOOKS
  • Format: Hardback | 32 pages
  • Dimensions: 218mm x 272mm x 10mm | 358g
  • Publication date: 23 March 1999
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0333710924
  • ISBN 13: 9780333710920
  • Illustrations note: colour illustrations
  • Sales rank: 3,125

Product description

This is a rhyming story of a mouse and a monster. Little mouse goes for a walk in a dangerous forest. To scare off his enemies he invents tales of a fantastical creature called the Gruffalo. So imagine his surprise when he meets the real Gruffalo.

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Review quote

A clever, exuberant story in rhyme with strong, color-saturated pictures to match . . . This is a sure bet. (Booklist)

Editorial reviews

The action of this rhymed and humorous tale centers upon a mouse who "took a stroll/through the deep dark wood./A fox saw the mouse/and the mouse looked good." The mouse escapes being eaten by telling the fox that he is on his way to meet his friend the gruffalo (a monster of his imagination), whose favorite food is roasted fox. The fox beats a hasty retreat. Similar escapes are in store for an owl and a snake; both hightail it when they learn the particulars: tusks, claws, terrible jaws, eyes orange, tongue black, purple prickles on its back. When the gruffalo suddenly materializes out of the mouse's head and into the forest, the mouse has to think quick, declaring himself inedible as the "scariest creature in the deep dark wood," and inviting the gruffalo to follow him to witness the effect he has on the other creatures. When the gruffalo hears that the mouse's favorite food is gruffalo crumble, he runs away. It's a fairly innocuous tale, with twists that aren't sharp enough and treachery that has no punch. Scheffler's funny scenes prevent the suspense from culminating; all his creatures, predator and prey, are downright lovable. (Kirkus Reviews)