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    Greater London: The Story of the Suburbs (Hardback) By (author) Nick Barratt

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    DescriptionLondon's suburbs may stretch for well over 600 square miles, but in historical accounts of the capital they tend to take something of a back seat. In "Greater London", historian Nick Barratt places them firmly centre stage, tracing their journey from hamlets and villages far out in the open countryside to fully fledged urban enclaves, simultaneously demonstrating the crucial role they have played in the creation of today's metropolis. Starting in the first century AD, he shows how the tiny settlements that grew up in the Thames Valley gradually developed, and how they were shaped by their proximity to the city. He describes the spread of the first suburbs beyond the city walls, and traces the ebb and flow of population as people moved in to find jobs or away to escape London's noise and bustle. He charts the transformation wrought by the coming of the railways, the fight to preserve Hampstead Heath, Epping Forest and other green spaces and the struggle to create a London-wide form of government. He gives an account of wartime destruction and peacetime reconstruction, and then brings the story to the present with a description of the very varied nature of today's suburbs and their inhabitants. In the process, he evokes Tudor Hackney and Georgian Hampton, explains why Victorian Battersea and Finchley were so different from one another, and follows Islington's fall from grace and subsequent recovery. Magnificently illustrated throughout with contemporary engravings and photographs, this is the essential history for anyone who has ever lived in London.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Greater London

    Title
    Greater London
    Subtitle
    The Story of the Suburbs
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Nick Barratt
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 608
    Width: 164 mm
    Height: 236 mm
    Thickness: 56 mm
    Weight: 1,120 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9781847945327
    ISBN 10: 1847945325
    Classifications

    B&T Merchandise Category: GEN
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1DBKESL
    Ingram Subject Code: RB
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.6
    BIC subject category V2: HBTB
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBJD1
    BISAC Merchandising Theme: ET030
    Ingram Theme: CULT/BRITIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBTG, WQH
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 03
    BISAC V2.8: HIS015000
    B&T General Subject: 431
    Abridged Dewey: 941
    Libri: ENGM2000
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: HIS018000
    Libri: LOND3040
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 15510
    LC subject heading:
    BIC subject category V2: 1DBKESL
    BISAC V2.8: HIS054000, REF013000
    DC23: 942.1
    BISAC region code: 1.1.2.2.0.0.0
    LC classification: DA677 .B37 2012
    Ingram Theme: ASPT/HISTAS
    Thema V1.0: NHTB, NHD, WQH
    Edition statement
    New ed.
    Illustrations note
    integrated black and white + colour plates
    Publisher
    Cornerstone
    Imprint name
    Random House Books
    Publication date
    17 December 2012
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    DR NICK BARRATT obtained a PhD in history from King's College London in 1996 and then went on to become a specialist archive researcher at the BBC. He is now a presenter, reviewer and commentator on all aspects of history, with a particular interest in the medieval period and family history. He is currently CEO of SRA (Sticks Research Agency), which he founded in 2000.
    Review quote
    "A superb work of research and is clearly and entertainingly written, sometimes intimidating in its attention to detail, but rarely dry" Daily Telegraph "A far-reaching, in-depth yet broadly-based history of London ... You don't have to be a Londoner to enjoy this heroic tale of people - and bricks and train-tracks triumphing to the detriment of green space" Independent "A masterful social history of London's suburbs" Your Family Tree magazine "Enjoyable and fact-packed book" Kensington and Chelsea Today
    Flap copy
    London's suburbs may stretch for well over 600 square miles, but in historical accounts of the capital they tend to take something of a back seat. In Greater London, historian Nick Barratt places them firmly centre stage, tracing their journey from hamlets and villages far out in the open countryside to fully fledged urban enclaves, and simultaneously demonstrating the crucial role they have played in the creation of today's metropolis. Starting in the first century AD, he shows how the tiny settlements that grew up in the Thames Valley gradually developed, and how they were shaped by their proximity to the city. He describes the spread of the first suburbs beyond the city walls, and traces the ebb and flow of population as people moved in to find jobs or away to escape London's noise and bustle. He charts the transformation wrought by the coming of the railways, the fight to preserve Hampstead Heath, Epping Forest and other green spaces, and the struggle to create a London-wide form of government. He gives an account of wartime destruction and peacetime reconstruction, and then brings the story to the present with a description of the very varied nature of today's suburbs and their inhabitants. In the process, he evokes Tudor Hackney and Georgian Hampton, explains why Victorian Battersea and Finchley were so different from one another, and follows Islington's fall from grace and subsequent recovery. Magnificently illustrated throughout with contemporary engravings and photographs, this is the essential history for anyone who has ever lived in London.