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    The Future We Left Behind (Hardback) By (author) Mike A Lancaster

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    DescriptionThousands of years in the future the divide between humanity and technology has become nearly unrecognizable. Each thought, each action is logged, coded, backed up. Data is as easily exchanged through the fiber-optic-like cables that extend from fingertips as it might be through ordinary conversation. It's a brave new world: A world that the Straker Tapes say is a result of many human "upgrades." But no one is sure whether the Straker Tapes are a work of fiction or an eerie peek into an unimaginable past. Nearly sixteen-year-old Peter Vincent has been raised to believe that everything that the backward Strakerites cling to is insane--an utter waste of time and potential. Since his father is David Vincent, genius inventor of the artificial bees that saved the world's crops and prevented massive famine, how could Peter believe anything else? But when Peter meets Alpha, a Strakerite his own age, suddenly the theories about society-upgrades don't sound quite so crazy, especially when she shows him evidence that another upgrade is imminent. And worse, there may be a conspiracy by the leaders of the establishment to cover it up. A conspiracy spearheaded by Peter's own father. Gripping and full of unexpected twists, "The Future We Left Behind "takes the unsettling questions raised in "Human.4," and flips them entirely. What if we knew that the very way we live was about to be changed in an instant, and we could stop it? And what if everything we are sure we know is entirely wrong?


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  • Entertaining but wanted more3

    Cherie 1000 years after the events of Kyle Straker (in 0.4) we find Peter Vincent - another teenage boy living a normal life - who realizes that all may not be as it seems. Overall this is a fun read and is entertaining. The plot moves quickly and, despite its almost 400 pages, this was a quick read for me. Fans of "light" sci-fi and male protagonists should enjoy this. I had high expectations after reading 0.4 and, while I enjoyed this one, it did not completely live up to those expectations.


    First, the plot and characters are really a re-hashing of the first book. This is even acknowledged in the book - the characters are referred to as paradigms of the original characters from 0.4. While I see that there is continuity and a reference to computer programming there, I was disappointed that there wasn't more originality in terms of character and plot.


    Speaking of characters, I didn't feel that there was enough character development here. The book isn't really about the characters, so I was able to overlook that and still enjoy the book, but I would have felt more invested in the story if I had more of a connection to the characters.


    Lastly, I was disappointed in the technological advancement of the society. Sure, there were some cool and advanced things. I loved the way they choose their clothes, I can see how the link would be the way everyone lives in the future, the extinction and replacement of bees is a true-to-life touch. But, c'mon! 1000 years have passed! That's a heck of a long time! Think of all the changes in our current world compared to the year 1012. The world described here does not really seem that different from our own - in language, dress, customs, schooling, culture, etc. 1000 years from now I don't think I would even recognize the world. And, maybe that's exactly why the author wrote the future the way he did. Maybe he didn't want to make it seem inaccessible to his teen audience. I think it was a missed opportunity.


    Despite these failings, this was a fast-paced, exciting and fun read. I enjoyed it and would recommend checking it out.

    Note: I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are 100% my own. by Cherie

  • Top review

    Better than the first one!4

    Sarah Elizabeth (Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to EgmontUSA and Netgalley.)
    This is the second book in the 0.4 series.
    It's been thousands of years since the human's operating systems were updated from 0.4 to 1.0, in fact only a small group of people even believe that this really happened. The 'Strakerites' as they are known are labelled as 'superstitious primitives' and live together in twin crystal towers within New Cambridge.

    15-year-old Peter Vincent lives in New Cambridge, and has a bit of a famous father. David Vincent is renowned for creating artificial honey bees to replace real bees when they became endangered due to a mite infection. He's also renowned for his disbelief in Strakerism.

    When Peter befriends a girl in his class called Alpha, he gets a whole lot more than he bargained for. Alpha and her family are Strakerites, and as events fall into place, Peter finds that he too begins to believe that Kyle Straker might have actually existed.


    I liked this book. To be perfectly honest I liked it more than book1 - 0.4. Peter is a much more interesting character, and I liked both Peter and Alpha much more than I liked Kyle and Lily. The story was a bit different, not the sort of thing you would normally come across, and I liked finding out how humanity had progressed post the 1.0 upgrade.

    I thought that the story flowed better, the ideas were better, and whole thing was just generally more entertaining.

    I did find that towards the end (around the 70% mark) I had a bit of an 'as-if' moment, I really don't see how the original village in 0.4 ended up where it was in this book, but I suppose that could be explained away with the advanced technology available at that time.

    Overall; If you liked 0.4, you'll like this, although again, I would suggest that this book is aimed at a younger teenage market.
    7.5 out of 10. by Sarah Elizabeth

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