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From Print to Stitch: Tips and Techniques for Hand-printing and Stitching on Fabric

From Print to Stitch: Tips and Techniques for Hand-printing and Stitching on Fabric

Book rating: 05 Hardback

By (author) Janet Edmonds

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  • Publisher: Search Press Ltd
  • Format: Hardback | 128 pages
  • Dimensions: 224mm x 282mm x 18mm | 880g
  • Publication date: 1 February 2011
  • Publication City/Country: Tunbridge Wells
  • ISBN 10: 1844484599
  • ISBN 13: 9781844484591
  • Illustrations note: 300 colour
  • Sales rank: 35,071

Product description

This highly practical and unique book provides clear, step-by-step instructions for adding amazing designs to fabric by printing and stitching. Using a whole range of printing techniques, including block printing, soft-cut lino printing, mono printing and collagraph printing, the author guides you carefully through the process, from initial idea, through the development of a theme, to designing and making a block and creating pattern on paper. Once you are happy with your design, it is transferred to fabric and finally stitching is added to enhance the design. Both machine and hand stitching are used, and there's a useful and extensive stitch library at the back of the book showing the range of stitches you can use. Janet's unique eye for colour is evident throughout the book, which is richly illustrated with numerous partly completed samples to illustrate the author's methods, finished examples of her work, and three-dimensional objects created using printed and stitched fabrics to extend the reader's imagination even further.

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Author information

Janet Edmonds trained at East Berkshire College, Windsor and The University of Hertfordshire, completing a BA (Hons) in Art and Design in 1998. She has many years experience of teaching City & Guilds courses in Embroidery in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire, and also runs courses for the Embroiderers' Guild. Her own work is mainly three-dimensional and is based on natural forms and landscapes. When not teaching, gardening and walking in the beautiful Chiltern countryside where she lives provide Janet with the inspiration for her drawing, painting and stitching.

Customer reviews

By Marie Johansen 28 Nov 2010 5

"From Print To Stitch" by Janet Edmonds, published by Search Press - is one of those books that you know you will be returning to time and time again. If you love cloth and love to print and stitch (as the title says) then this is a book that should be in your library.
Ms. Edmonds previously published book was called was called "Beginners Guide to Embroidered Boxes" and now I am afraid that I have to get this one too - her work is so exciting.
The contents page of "From Print To Stitch" is a good introduction to fabulous techniques that lurk within the book's pages. She thoroughly covers materials and tools, how to develop a theme in your work and a short but very well done lesson on color and color theory. The next section is on printing and the topics include: block printing, lino cuts, mono printing and how to make great impressions from found objects. Naturally the next section is about stitching. Hand stitching and machine stitching. One of my favorite sections in this part of the book is her gallery of hand stitches. Lots of grist for the artistic mill in here.
The techniques for working with lino, sponges and a host of other easily found printing methods are thoroughly explained and photographed with step-by-step instructions. In this section of the book I am especially fond her use of collagraph prints and I am eager to give this a try. The author describes collagraph as "made from a block that is created from low tech collaged material". Can you spell play day?! This book is just chock full of really fun techniques that are bound to spark your creativity and give your many hours of fun - you may not look at plain cloth in the same way again. Yes. I am really enjoying this excellent book!

This book is one of those ?must have? addition to your library if you are a textile enthusiast of any sort!

Review quote

Janet's inspirational how-to-do-it book, with sumptuous colour photography and detailed step-by-step instructions covers every aspect of the subject. Chapters on materials, tools, colour and design are followed by a comprehensive section on several different types of printing, concluding with a stitch glossary for both hand and machine. Packed with information this is highly recommended as a must-have volume for all textile students; the more experienced crafter will be inspired to experiment and push the boundaries to bring a new dimension to their work.-East Kent Embroiderers' Guild Using print and stitch, this book shows you how to add unique surface designs to your work. As well as the techniques, there are useful chapters on developing an idea into a theme and the use of colour. Perhaps more suitable for embroiderers than quilters, many of the ideas could be used to add texture and interest to embellished wallhangings.-The Quilter "From Print To Stitch" by Janet Edmonds, published by Search Press - is one of those books that you know you will be returning to time and time again. If you love cloth and love to print and stitch (as the title says) then this is a book that should be in your library. Ms. Edmonds previously published book was called was called "Beginners Guide to Embroidered Boxes" and now I am afraid that I have to get this one too - her work is so exciting. The contents page of "From Print To Stitch" is a good introduction to fabulous techniques that lurk within the book's pages. She thoroughly covers materials and tools, how to develop a theme in your work and a short but very well done lesson on color and color theory. The next section is on printing and the topics include: block printing, lino cuts, mono printing and how to make great impressions from found objects. Naturally the next section is about stitching. Hand stitching and machine stitching. One of my favorite sections in this part of the book is her gallery of hand stitches. Lots of grist for the artistic mill in here. The techniques for working with lino, sponges and a host of other easily found printing methods are thoroughly explained and photographed with step-by-step instructions. In this section of the book I am especially fond her use of collagraph prints and I am eager to give this a try. The author describes collagraph as "made from a block that is created from low tech collaged material". Can you spell play day?! This book is just chock full of really fun techniques that are bound to spark your creativity and give your many hours of fun - you may not look at plain cloth in the same way again. Yes. I am really enjoying this excellent book! This book is one of those must haveA" addition to your library if you are a textile enthusiast of any sort!-booksbythewillowtree.blogspot.com Janet's inspirational how-to-do-it book, with sumptuous colour photography and detailed step-by-step instructions covers every aspect of the subject. Chapters on materials, tools, colour and design are followed by a comprehensive section on several different types of printing, concluding with a stitch glossary for both hand and machine. Packed with information this is highly recommended as a must-have volume for all textile students; the more experienced crafter will be inspired to experiment and push the boundaries to bring a new dimension to their work.-East Kent Embroiderers' Guild Make your mark in your own inimitable way on fabric with the aid of this book. Then, when you have done so adorn your work with stitches and make it into a one-of-a-kind top fashion item. If there is one thing better than a good paperback it is surely a good hardback and this is one of Search Press' rare examples. It shows the reader that print making is not just for professionals with an array of expensive equipment but can easily be attempted with excellent results at home. Make lino cuts, monoprints, carve erasers, texturize foam and all other kinds of comparatively ordinary things (including the humble potato) and use them to make your prints. Discover where to get ideas from and how to adapt them (often the hardest part of all) and what types of paint or ink to use for best results. Then embellish the printed fabric with all kinds of fairly easy stitches (this is not a book on fancy embroidery, just stitchery) by hand or machine. There are lots of examples of work, including those taken from an idea and seen through from sketch to finished item which is sure to inspire. Those more taken with the abstract than the representational will particularly be impressed as most of the examples are more in that style. If this is not your taste at least this is a good way to learn how to make prints inexpensively and often fairly quickly then have more fun with them later. A very useful book for anybody interested in the fiber arts.-Myshelf.com Learn the secrets of textile artist Janet Edmonds and create unique designs using her tips and techniques for printing and stitching on fabric. Richly illustrated throughout with glorious close-up photos this gorgeous book shows how to create vibrant and tactile designs from initial concept through to final embellishments. This practical guide starts with the basics of ink and paints along with a summary of tools and equipment before progressing on to creating motifs and blocks. Several themes are explored to demonstrate to the reader the potential for translating ideas into printed textiles and a basic summary of working with colour is also included. A variety of printing techniques are covered for block, eraser, mono, line and calligraph in addition to using simple found objects. The second part of the book focuses on stitching and the book culminates with an extensive gallery of hand and machine stitches to add further texture and colour.-Sewing World Printing is an age-old technique, but there's nothing old or dated about the way that Janet takes you through a variety of methods suitable for printing on fabric. None of the methods is high-tech; to get started, you only need some basic equipment - lino-cutting tools and a roller are about as complicated as it gets. Block printing, lino and soft-cut lino (a product that achieves the same effect but is much easier to cut) and monoprinting are the main methods, but there are plenty of ideas within each technique. Using found objects, such as washers, string and even bubblewrap, creates some interesting patterns - and what could be simpler than string or elastic bands wrapped around a stout careboard tube and used like a rolling pin? As she takes you from an initial idea through the development of a theme to the making of a block and the printing of the design, Janet's love of print and colour shines through. The printed surfaces are enhanced with simple stitches; lovely, textural hand stitches are most in evidence, but there's also a small section on machine stitching - and some of the pieces combine both techniques.-Stitch Janet Edmonds is inspired by the elaborately decorated boxes and caskets of past centuries and in this book she shows the reader how to create a collection of richly stitched boxes, using a combination of machine and hand embroidery. Her own beautiful boxes are constructed by machine stitching layers of fabric together, she then embellishes, blends and enriches the surfaces using threads, goldwork, stitching, fabric, metals, wire, beads and stamped images. This beautifully illustrated book, as well as showcasing Janet's enviable workmanship, offers detailed step-by-step photographs with easy to follow text for a range of projects, showing how to construct, decorate and complete a variety of boxes, with guidance on materials, tools, themes, colour, printing and stitching.-Sew Today Take a piece of plain fabric, add a print using one of several techniques then stitch over the top by hand or machine to create a unique and texturally interesting fabric. If this appeals to you then grab a copy of this book and discover the wonderful world of printing on fabric. Learn which paints are suitable to use, make your own printing tools using items such as a sponge, cut potato or a lino tile and then discover how to add complimentary stitching. If you are looking to take your textile art to a new level then this book is a terrific place to add to your skill level.-Innovative Machine Embroidery & Textile Art