The Freud-Jung Letters: The Correspondence Between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung

The Freud-Jung Letters: The Correspondence Between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung

Paperback Bollingen Series (General)

By (author) Sigmund Freud, By (author) C. G. Jung, Edited by William McGuire, Translated by Ralph Manheim, Translated by R. F. C. Hull

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  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Format: Paperback | 328 pages
  • Dimensions: 137mm x 198mm x 20mm | 272g
  • Publication date: 31 July 1994
  • Publication City/Country: New Jersey
  • ISBN 10: 0691036438
  • ISBN 13: 9780691036434
  • Edition: Abridged
  • Edition statement: Abridged
  • Sales rank: 345,108

Product description

This abridged edition makes the Freud/Jung correspondence accessible to a general readership at a time of renewed critical and historical reevaluation of the documentary roots of modern psychoanalysis. This edition reproduces William McGuire's definitive introduction, but does not contain the critical apparatus of the original edition.

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Review quote

"The relationship between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung had its bright beginning in 1906 and came to its embittered end in 1913. Its disastrous course was charted by the many letters the two men wrote each other... In 1970 the Freud and Jung families made the enlightened decision that this correspondence was to be edited as a unit and published... In no way does it disappoint the large expectation it has naturally aroused. Both as it bears upon the personal lives of the men between whom the letters passed and upon the intellectual history of our epoch, it is a document of inestimable importance."--Lionel Trilling, The New York Times Book Review

Back cover copy

'The substance of intellectual history at a turning point is in these letters. The impression is of two immensely ambitious, self-willed, often inspired men, who had set themselves apart as innovators, roped together in a long climb into a new world.' -The Observer

Table of contents

Editorial Note (1994) The Jungs in Vienna (March 1907) The Salzburg Congress (April 1908) Freud in England and Zurich (September 1908) The Jungs again in Vienna (March 1909) The Clark Conference (September 1909) The Nuremberg Congress (March 1910) The Munich Meetings (December 1910) The Weimar Congress (September 1911) The Fordham Lectures; the Committee (July-September 1912) The Munich Conference (November 1912) The Munich Congress (September 1913) The end of the Jarbuch (October 1913) The Final Break (July 1914) Appendix: The Collected Editions in English Index