Free Prize Inside: The Next Big Marketing Idea

Free Prize Inside: The Next Big Marketing Idea

Paperback

By (author) Seth Godin

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  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
  • Format: Paperback | 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 129mm x 198mm x 16mm | 181g
  • Publication date: 2 March 2006
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0141019719
  • ISBN 13: 9780141019710
  • Sales rank: 295,422

Product description

Remember when cereal boxes came with a free prize inside? You already liked the cereal, but once you saw that there was a free prize inside - something small yet precious - it became irresistible. In his new book, Seth Godin shows how you can make your customers feel that way again. "Free Prize Inside" is jammed with practical ideas you can use right now to make something happen, no matter what kind of company you work for. Something irresistible. Something that markets itself. Because everything we do is marketing - even if you're not in the marketing department. Here's a step-by-step way to get your organization to do something remarkable: quickly, cheaply and reliably. You don't need an MBA or a huge budget. All you need is a strategy for finding great ideas and convincing others to help you make them happen.

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Author information

Seth Godin has cult-like status in the marketing world and is the author of the international bestseller Permission Marketing and Purple Cow.

Review quote

Godin makes the case for ?soft innovation? as the best way to grow a business, instead of relying on big ads or big innovation. He says that anyone can think up clever, useful, and small ideas to make a product or service remarkable, that is, worth talking about. He calls this kind of innovation a free prize because it generates much more revenue than it costs to implement. ("Management Consulting News")