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    Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television (Paperback) By (author) Jerry Mander

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    DescriptionA total departure from previous writing about television, this book is the first ever to advocate that the medium is not reformable. Its problems are inherent in the technology itself and are so dangerous -- to personal health and sanity, to the environment, and to democratic processes -- that TV ought to be eliminated forever.Weaving personal experiences through meticulous research, the author ranges widely over aspects of television that have rarely been examined and never before joined together, allowing an entirely new, frightening image to emerge. The idea that all technologies are "neutral," benign instruments that can be used well or badly, is thrown open to profound doubt. Speaking of TV reform is, in the words of the author, "as absurd as speaking of the reform of a technology such as guns."


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    Timeless5

    Nathan Bedford When reading this book I was expecting to find some insight but I also expected it to be dated, naturally.
    Instead I found the insight was was considerable and the nature of the insight is as though is was written last year.
    Either Mr Mander was privy to some research he could not specifically mention or the nature of media does not change regardless how it is presented.
    I believe the latter is more likely though the former cannot be entirely discounted from the research I have at hand.
    Whatever it may be though, this book is more pertinent to our situation now in the 21 Century than when it was first written over 30 years ago. by Nathan Bedford

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