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    For Whom the Bell Tolls (Paperback) By (author) Ernest Hemingway

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    DescriptionHigh in the pine forests of the Spanish Sierra, a guerrilla band prepares to blow up a vital bridge. Robert Jordan, a young American volunteer, has been sent to handle the dyamiting. There, in the mountains, he finds the dangers and the intense comradeship of war. And there he discovers Maria, a young woman who has escaped from Franco's rebels. Like many of his novels adapted into a major Hollywood film, For Whom the bell Tolls is one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century by one of the greatest American writers.


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    Title
    For Whom the Bell Tolls
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Ernest Hemingway
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 496
    Width: 110 mm
    Height: 178 mm
    Thickness: 30 mm
    Weight: 262 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780099908609
    ISBN 10: 0099908603
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: ADV
    LC subject heading:
    DC20: 813.52
    BIC subject category V2: FA
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F2.7
    DC22: FIC
    Libri: ENGM1010
    BIC subject category V2: FJM
    LC subject heading: ,
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 21110
    Libri: AMER3710
    BISAC V2.8: FIC004000
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    LC subject heading:
    Thema V1.0: FJM, FBA
    Publisher
    Cornerstone
    Imprint name
    ARROW BOOKS LTD
    Publication date
    18 August 1994
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Author Information
    Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in Chicago in 1899 as the son of a doctor and the second of six children. After a stint as an ambulance driver at the Italian front, Hemingway came home to America in 1919, only to return to the battlefield - this time as a reporter on the Greco-Turkish war - in 1922. Resigning from journalism to focus on his writing instead, he moved to Paris where he renewed his earlier friendship with fellow American expatriates such as Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein. Through the years, Hemingway travelled widely and wrote avidly, becoming an internationally recognized literary master of his crat. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954, following the publication of The Old Man and the Sea. He died in 1961.
    Review quote
    "One of the greatest novels which our troubled age will produce" Observer "The best fictional report on the Spanish Civil War that we possess" -- Anthony Burgess "The best book Hemingway has written" New York Times
    Review text
    This is good Hemingway. It has some of the tenderness of A Farewell to Arms and some of its amazing power to make one feel inside the picture of a nation at war, of the people experiencing war shorn of its glamor, of the emotions that the effects of war - rather than war itself - arouse. But in style and tempo and impact, there is greater resemblance to The Sun Also Rises. Implicit in the characters and the story is the whole tragic lesson of Spain's Civil War, proving ground for today's holocaust, and carrying in its small compass, the contradictions, the human frailties, the heroism and idealism and shortcomings. In retrospect the thread of the story itself is slight. Three days, during which time a young American, a professor who has taken his Sabbatical year from the University of Montana to play his part in the struggle for Loyalist Spain and democracy. He is sent to a guerilla camp of partisans within the Fascist lines to blow up a strategic bridge. His is a complex problem in humanity, a group of undisciplined, unorganized natives, emotionally geared to go their own way, while he has a job that demands unreasoning, unwavering obedience. He falls in love with a lovely refugee girl, escaping the terrors of a fascist imprisonment, and their romance is sharply etched against a gruesome background. It is a searing book; Hemingway has done more to dramatize the Spanish War than any amount of abstract declamation. Yet he has done it through revealing the pettinesses, the indignities, the jealousies, the cruelties on both sides, never glorifying simply presenting starkly the belief in the principles for which these people fought a hopeless war, to give the rest of the world an interval to prepare. There is something of the implacable logic of Verdun in the telling. It's not a book for the thin-skinned; it has more than its fill of obscenities and the style is clipped and almost too elliptical for clarity at times. But it is a book that repays one for bleak moments of unpleasantness. (Kirkus Reviews)